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lunge1

[luhnj] /lʌndʒ/
noun
1.
a sudden forward thrust, as with a sword or knife; stab.
2.
any sudden forward movement; plunge.
verb (used without object), lunged, lunging.
3.
to make a lunge or thrust; move with a lunge.
verb (used with object), lunged, lunging.
4.
to thrust (something) forward; cause to move with a lunge:
lunging his finger accusingly.
Origin
1725-1735
1725-35; earlier longe for French allonge (noun; construed as a longe), allonger (v.) to lengthen, extend, deliver (blows) < Vulgar Latin *allongāre, for Late Latin ēlongāre to elongate
Synonyms
2. rush, charge, lurch.

lunge2

[luhnj] /lʌndʒ/
noun, verb, lunged, lunging.
1.
Origin
variant of longe < French; see longe, lune2
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for lunge
  • For their current task is not to lunge at each other, but to draw up long-term political platforms for their parties.
  • Then he would surge into a moment's jazzy lunge or pivot.
  • With a sudden lunge he slammed my back with both hands and charged off, slapping and stamping the ground.
  • Drop down into a lunge squat, then contract your glutes as you push back up into an upright body position.
  • Short, powerful legs propel his trademark lethal lunge and fabled leaps.
  • He cannot be around kids as he will growl and lunge at them.
  • If you lunge at this opportunity, however, the story comes out all wrong.
  • The dogs lunge ahead, chasing pigeons and romping in the would-be forest.
  • One also noted the occasional lunge beyond the music's natural momentum.
  • The dancer makes a last bone-juddering lunge, freezes, and then staggers drunkenly off to the wings.
British Dictionary definitions for lunge

lunge1

/lʌndʒ/
noun
1.
a sudden forward motion
2.
(fencing) a thrust made by advancing the front foot and straightening the back leg, extending the sword arm forwards
verb
3.
to move or cause to move with a lunge
4.
(intransitive) (fencing) to make a lunge
Derived Forms
lunger, noun
Word Origin
C18: shortened form of obsolete C17 allonge, from French allonger to stretch out (one's arm), from Late Latin ēlongāre to lengthen. Compare elongate

lunge2

/lʌndʒ/
noun
1.
a rope used in training or exercising a horse
verb
2.
(transitive) to exercise or train (a horse) on a lunge
Word Origin
C17: from Old French longe, shortened from allonge, ultimately from Latin longuslong1; related to lunge1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for lunge
n.

1735, "a thrust with a sword," originally a fencing term, shortened from allonge, from French allonger "to extend, thrust," from Old French alongier "to lengthen, make long," from à "to" + Old French long, from Latin longus "long" (see long (adj.)).

v.

1735 (implied in lunged), from lunge (n.). Sense of "to make a sudden forward rush" is from 1821. Related: Lunged; lunging.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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