maddening

[mad-n-ing]
adjective
1.
driving to madness or frenzy: a maddening thirst.
2.
infuriating or exasperating: his maddening indifference to my pleas.
3.
raging; furious: a maddening wind.

Origin:
1735–45; madden + -ing2

maddeningly, adverb
maddeningness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged

madden

[mad-n]
verb (used with object)
1.
to anger or infuriate: The delays maddened her.
2.
to make insane.
verb (used without object)
3.
to become mad; act as if mad; rage.

Origin:
1725–35; mad + -en1

unmaddened, adjective


1. provoke, enrage, anger, inflame; exasperate, irritate, vex, annoy.


1. calm, mollify.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
madden (ˈmædən)
 
vb
to make or become mad or angry

maddening (ˈmædənɪŋ)
 
adj
1.  serving to send mad
2.  extremely annoying; exasperating
 
maddeningly
 
adv
 
maddeningness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

maddening
from madden, which is attested from 1735 in the sense "to become mad," 1822 in the sense "to drive to distraction" (see mad). Related: Maddeningly.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
In its maddening dash through the swirling dust the machine takes on the
  attributes of a sentient thing.
The idea that creativity needs to be justified on any level is maddening.
We all know the maddening experience of not being able to think of a certain
  word that is undoubtedly in our repertoire.
The main problem with probability theory is that the logic is completely
  maddening.
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