follow Dictionary.com

Dictionary.com's Word of the Year is...

madly

[mad-lee] /ˈmæd li/
adverb
1.
insanely or wildly:
The old witch cackled madly.
2.
with desperate haste or intensity; furiously:
They worked madly to repair the bridge.
3.
foolishly:
They lived madly, wasting all their money.
4.
extremely:
They're madly in love.
Origin
1175-1225
1175-1225; Middle English; see mad, -ly
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for madly
  • It resembled those game things kids are always poking madly.
  • The bees nearest to the spill clustered around, cleaning the top bars madly.
  • Dozens of dogs of all breeds and sizes raced around madly.
  • Their joy and excitement were palpable as they madly cheered their cars around the track.
  • All the while, space age windmills line the coast, spinning madly.
  • But eventually, as you progress through the book and keep flipping pages madly, you see more and more feeling in his writing.
  • Heights begin to surge upward at a madly accelerating rate.
  • They madly multiplied and sold endless units of speculation when prudence and foresight required them firmly to impose restraint.
  • His face was ashen, and his eyes darted madly at the cars around them.
  • But it had dragged some liquid nitrogen with it from the flask, and was steaming madly.
British Dictionary definitions for madly

madly

/ˈmædlɪ/
adverb
1.
in an insane or foolish manner
2.
with great speed and energy
3.
(informal) extremely or excessively: I love you madly
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for madly
adv.

early 13c., from mad (adj.) + -ly (2). Colloquial meaning "passionately" had emerged by 18c.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Nearby words for madly