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maniac

[mey-nee-ak] /ˈmeɪ niˌæk/
noun
1.
a raving or violently insane person; lunatic.
2.
any intemperate or overly zealous or enthusiastic person:
a maniac when it comes to details.
adjective
3.
Origin
1595-1605
1595-1605; < Medieval Latin maniacus of, pertaining to madness. See mania, -ac
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for maniac
  • On one hand, the idea of a crazy maniac on board is spine chilling.
  • In the same vein, someone who is extremely cool is considered either fresh or maniac.
  • It ends with a maniac nurse on the loose trying to take over all students' minds.
  • We supported this blood soaked maniac, now it is our duty to help those opposing his tyranny.
  • The manifesto is the work of neither a genius nor a maniac.
  • Wood is ominously good at the stillness of this maniac, which only doubles the shock.
  • He was a homicidal maniac in a hurry, and terribly afraid that he might not make it.
  • Once he has been locked up, a homicidal maniac has limited opportunities.
  • So there's nothing more disturbing than being trapped with some maniac in headphones who periodically erupts in cackling laughter.
  • The author is being chased by an ax-wielding maniac and rushes to a nearby lighthouse to escape.
British Dictionary definitions for maniac

maniac

/ˈmeɪnɪˌæk/
noun
1.
a wild disorderly person
2.
a person who has a great craving or enthusiasm for something: a football maniac
3.
(psychiatry, obsolete) a person afflicted with mania
Word Origin
C17: from Late Latin maniacus belonging to madness, from Greek

maniacal

/məˈnaɪəkəl/
adjective
1.
affected with or characteristic of mania
2.
characteristic of or befitting a maniac: maniacal laughter
Derived Forms
maniacally, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for maniac
adj.

c.1600, "pertaining to mania; insane," from French maniaque (14c.), from Late Latin maniacus, from Greek maniakos, from mania (see mania). Borrowed at first in French form; Latinized in English from 1727. The noun is attested from 1763, from the adjective.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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maniac in Medicine

maniac ma·ni·ac (mā'nē-āk')
n.
An insane person.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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