mastery

[mas-tuh-ree, mah-stuh-]
noun, plural masteries for 1-4.
1.
command or grasp, as of a subject: a mastery of Italian.
2.
superiority or victory: mastery over one's enemies.
3.
the act of mastering.
4.
expert skill or knowledge.
5.
the state of being master; power of command or control.

Origin:
1175–1225; master + -y3; replacing Middle English maistrie < Old French

nonmastery, noun, plural nonmasteries.
premastery, noun
remastery, noun, plural remasteries.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To mastery
Collins
World English Dictionary
mastery (ˈmɑːstərɪ)
 
n , pl -teries
1.  full command or understanding of a subject
2.  outstanding skill; expertise
3.  the power of command; control
4.  victory or superiority

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

mastery
early 13c., mesterie, "condition of being a master," also "superiority, victory;" from O.Fr. maistrie, from maistre (see master). Meaning "intellectual command" (of a topic, etc.) is from 1660s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
Nor does this command of minute detail in any sense bar the way to an equal
  mastery of broad, general effects.
We have a mastery over our selves and our environments that is peculiar to our
  species.
It even has a chapter on the changes that occur in the brain during practice
  and mastery.
Once it no longer holds such a strong charge, having managed the problem will
  instill a sense of mastery.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;