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mending

[men-ding] /ˈmɛn dɪŋ/
noun
1.
the act of a person or thing that mends.
2.
articles, especially clothes, to be mended:
Grandmother always kept her mending in this wicker basket.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English; see mend, -ing1

mend

[mend] /mɛnd/
verb (used with object)
1.
to make (something broken, worn, torn, or otherwise damaged) whole, sound, or usable by repairing:
to mend old clothes; to mend a broken toy.
2.
to remove or correct defects or errors in.
3.
to set right; make better; improve:
to mend matters.
verb (used without object)
4.
to progress toward recovery, as a sick person.
5.
(of broken bones) to grow back together; knit.
6.
to improve, as conditions or affairs.
noun
7.
the act of mending; repair or improvement.
8.
a mended place.
Idioms
9.
mend sail, Nautical. to refurl sails that have been badly furled.
Also, mend the furl.
10.
on the mend,
  1. recovering from an illness.
  2. improving in general, as a state of affairs:
    The breach between father and son is on the mend.
Origin
1150-1200; Middle English menden, aphetic variant of amend
Related forms
mendable, adjective
remend, verb
unmendable, adjective
unmended, adjective
well-mended, adjective
Synonyms
1. fix, restore, retouch. Mend, darn, patch mean to repair something and thus renew its usefulness. Mend is a general expression that emphasizes the idea of making whole something damaged: to mend a broken dish, a tear in an apron. Darn and patch are more specific, referring particularly to repairing holes or rents. To darn is to repair by means of stitches interwoven with one another: to darn stockings. To patch is to cover a hole or rent (usually) with a piece or pieces of similar material and to secure the edges of these; it implies a more temporary or makeshift repair than the others: to patch the knees of trousers, a rubber tire. 2. rectify, amend, emend. 3. ameliorate, meliorate. 4. heal, recover, amend.
Antonyms
1. ruin, destroy, 4. die, sicken.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for mending
  • Financial aid would only discourage countries from mending their finances.
  • mending the devastation they wrought will require more statesmanship than the nation has ever known.
  • Ruddy-cheeked and plaid-clad, he could as easily be out here hunting chukar or mending downed fences.
  • What you are seeing in the micros are not bruises, they are the mending process.
  • His tact and caution often made him the only go-between available for mending fences.
  • Now, though the overall economy seems to be mending, housing remains stubbornly weak.
  • They also learned about washing and ironing, mending and sewing, baking and cooking.
  • We can provide a variety of repair services from simple mending to heavy duty fabric reinforcement.
  • The flattened maps were then reattached to the supports using hinges of mending tissue around the perimeter.
  • mending pages should only be performed as needed to allow the material to be handled during preparation and filming.
British Dictionary definitions for mending

mending

/ˈmɛndɪŋ/
noun
1.
something to be mended, esp clothes

mend

/mɛnd/
verb
1.
(transitive) to repair (something broken or unserviceable)
2.
to improve or undergo improvement; reform (often in the phrase mend one's ways)
3.
(intransitive) to heal or recover
4.
(intransitive) (of conditions) to improve; become better
5.
(transitive) (Northern English) to feed or stir (a fire)
noun
6.
the act of repairing
7.
a mended area, esp on a garment
8.
on the mend, becoming better, esp in health
Derived Forms
mendable, adjective
mender, noun
Word Origin
C12: shortened from amend
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for mending

mend

v.

c.1200, "to repair," from a shortened form of Old French amender (see amend). Meaning "to put right, atone for, amend (one's life), repent" is from c.1300; that of "to regain health" is from early 15c. Related: Mended; mending.

n.

early 14c., "recompense, reparation," from mend (v.). Meaning "act of mending; a repaired hole or rip in fabric" is from 1888. Phrase on the mend attested from 1802.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Idioms and Phrases with mending
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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