militate

[mil-i-teyt]
verb (used without object), militated, militating.
1.
to have a substantial effect; weigh heavily: His prison record militated against him.
2.
Obsolete.
a.
to be a soldier.
b.
to fight for a belief.

Origin:
1615–25; < Latin mīlitātus (past participle of mīlitāre to serve as a soldier), equivalent to mīlit- (stem of mīles) soldier + -ātus -ate1

militation, noun

militate, mitigate (see usage note at mitigate).


See mitigate.
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World English Dictionary
militate (ˈmɪlɪˌteɪt)
 
vb
(intr; usually foll by against or for) (of facts, actions, etc) to have influence or effect: the evidence militated against his release
 
[C17: from Latin mīlitātus, from mīlitāre to be a soldier]
 
 
mili'tation
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

militate
1625, "to serve as a soldier," from L. militatum, pp. of militare "serve as a soldier," from miles "soldier" (see military). Sense developed via "conflict with," to "be evidence" (for or against), 1642.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Such factors militate against a speedy turnaround next year, say the pessimists.
If anything, it is likely to militate against prisoners' rehabilitation.
The follies of the past do not militate the policy of today.
Other factors militate against major reliance on tax increases as well.
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