misleading

[mis-lee-ding]
adjective
deceptive; tending to mislead.

Origin:
1630–40; mislead + -ing2

misleadingly, adverb
misleadingness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged

mislead

[mis-leed]
verb (used with object), misled, misleading.
1.
to lead or guide wrongly; lead astray.
2.
to lead into error of conduct, thought, or judgment.
verb (used without object), misled, misleading.
3.
to be misleading; tend to deceive: vague directions that often mislead.

Origin:
before 1050; Middle English misleden, Old English mislǣdan. See mis-1, lead1

misleader, noun
unmisled, adjective


1. misguide, misdirect. 2. delude, deceive.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
mislead (mɪsˈliːd)
 
vb , -leads, -leading, -led
1.  to give false or misleading information to
2.  to lead or guide in the wrong direction
 
mis'leader
 
n

misleading (mɪsˈliːdɪŋ)
 
adj
tending to confuse or mislead; deceptive
 
misleadingly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin & History

mislead
O.E. mislædan, common Gmc. compound (cf. M.L.G., M.Du. misleiden, O.H.G. misseleiten, Ger. missleiten, Dan. mislede); see mis- (1) + lead (v.). Related: misleading; misled.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Not to mention that the legal standards for proving that marketing is
  misleading or deceptive may be quite different from my own.
It would be quite misleading to argue from the customary inhibition, a cultural
  fact, to the native temperament.
But the suggested comparison is misleading and the criticism is unfair.
Another misleading argument for war needs brief notice.
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