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mort1

[mawrt] /mɔrt/
noun
1.
Hunting. the note played on a hunting horn signifying that the animal hunted has been killed.
2.
Obsolete, death.
Origin of mort1
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English < Middle French < Latin mort- (stem of mors) death

mort2

[mawrt] /mɔrt/
noun
1.
a three-year-old salmon.
Origin
1520-30; origin uncertain

mort3

[mawrt] /mɔrt/
noun, British Dialect
1.
lard.
Origin
1600-10; origin uncertain

Mort

[mawrt] /mɔrt/
noun
1.
a male given name, form of Mortimer or Morton.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for mort
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • mort de Dieu, we can but try to get out of this,” Sire Edward said.

    Chivalry James Branch Cabell
  • I was helping to get out the pinnace, and there is a mort of dust and dirt about her.

    Standish of Standish Jane G. Austin
  • mort de ma vie, if we had not as great a respect for you as a garrison for the conqueror of a fortress.

    The Robbers Friedrich Schiller
  • He reflected that mort had shouldered him aside and won her favor, then boasted of it.

  • I was uncommonly busy through that afternoon, for it was market-day, and there were a mort of people going in and out.

    Fenton's Quest M. E. Braddon
British Dictionary definitions for mort

mort1

/mɔːt/
noun
1.
a call blown on a hunting horn to signify the death of the animal hunted
Word Origin
C16: via Old French from Latin mors death

mort2

/mɔːt/
noun
1.
a great deal; a great many
Word Origin
possibly a shortened form of mortal used as an intensifier
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for mort
n.

"girl, woman" (especially one of loose morals), 1560s, canting jargon, of unknown origin.

note sounded on a horn at the death of the quarry, c.1500, from French mort "dead," from Latin mortem (source of Spanish muerte, Italian morte), accusative of mors "death" (see mortal (adj.)). Or from French mort "dead," from Vulgar Latin *mortus, from Latin mortuus.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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