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mush1

[muhsh or especially for 2–5, moo sh] /mʌʃ or especially for 2–5, mʊʃ/
noun
1.
meal, especially cornmeal, boiled in water or milk until it forms a thick, soft mass, or until it is stiff enough to mold into a loaf for slicing and frying.
2.
any thick, soft mass.
3.
mawkish sentimentality or amorousness.
4.
anything unpleasantly or contemptibly lacking in coherence, force, dignity, etc.:
His entire argument was simply mush.
verb (used with object)
5.
to squeeze or crush; crunch:
to mush all the candy together in a sticky ball.
Origin
1665-1675
1665-75, Americanism; obscurely akin to mash1

mush2

[muhsh] /mʌʃ/
verb (used without object)
1.
to go or travel, especially over snow with a dog team and sled.
verb (used with object)
2.
to drive or spur on (sled dogs or a sled drawn by dogs).
interjection
3.
go! (used as an order to start or speed up a dog team)
noun
4.
a trip or journey, especially across snow and ice with a dog team.
Origin
1895-1900; perhaps orig. as phrasal v. mush on! < Canadian French, French marchons! let's go!; see march1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for mush
  • Hot rocks were then added to the acorn mush or soup and moved about with paddles until the acorn meal was cooked.
  • Gathered seeds and ground them into meal and made mush or bread.
  • Literary studies, they feared, was turning into a mush of relativism.
  • Be careful not to overprocess or your rice will become mush.
  • When the cold weather hits, they'll get bland and then turn to mush.
  • Scientists believe the magma chambers-or reservoirs of molten rock-under dormant volcanoes are filled with sticky, viscous mush.
  • They mush off across the snow, riding deeper and deeper into the frozen wilderness.
  • Not in the middle of all this rich blackness that could easily turn into bland, gray mush if made too light.
  • They have gelatinous bodies, so when nets are dragged through the water, the nets turn the jellies into so much mush.
  • The consensus appears to be that when you try to defrost a frozen corpse you get mush.
British Dictionary definitions for mush

mush1

/mʌʃ/
noun
1.
a soft pulpy mass or consistency
2.
(US) a thick porridge made from corn meal
3.
(informal) cloying sentimentality
4.
(radio) interference in reception, esp a hissing noise
verb
5.
(transitive) to reduce (a substance) to a soft pulpy mass
Word Origin
C17: from obsolete moose porridge; probably related to mash; compare Old English mōs food

mush2

/mʌʃ/
interjection
1.
an order to dogs in a sled team to start up or go faster
verb
2.
to travel by or drive a dog sled
3.
(intransitive) to travel on foot, esp with snowshoes
noun
4.
a journey with a dogsled
Derived Forms
musher, noun
Word Origin
C19: perhaps from French marchez or marchons, imperatives of marcher to advance

mush3

/mʊʃ/
noun (Brit)
1.
a slang word for face (sense 1)
Word Origin
C19: from mush1, alluding to the softness of the face

mush4

/mʊʃ/
noun
1.
(Brit, slang) a familiar or contemptuous term of address
Word Origin
C19: probably from Gypsy moosh a man
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for mush
n.

"kind of porridge," 1670s, in the American colonies, variant of mash (n.) "soft mixture." Meaning "anything soft and thick" is attested from 1824.

interj.

command to sled dogs, first recorded 1862, as mouche, perhaps altered from French marchons! "advance!" (imperative of marcher "to march;" see march (v.)).

v.

"to pound to a pulp," 1781, from mush (n.). Related: Mushed; mushing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for mush

mush 1

noun
  1. Empty and exaggerated talk; baloney: Don't hand me that mush, pal (1841+)
  2. Sentimentality; saccharinity; corn, schmaltz: They were all weeping over the Dickensian mush (1908+)

[perhaps an alteration of mash, ''something soft and pulpy'']


mush 2

noun

The face, esp the mouth and jaws: He pulled his mush away from the plate and sighed

[1859+; origin unknown; perhaps fr Romany, ''man'']


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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mush in Technology
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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