musing

[myoo-zing]

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English; see muse, -ing2, -ing1

musingly, adverb
unmusing, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged

muse

[myooz]
verb (used without object), mused, musing.
1.
to think or meditate in silence, as on some subject.
2.
Archaic. to gaze meditatively or wonderingly.
verb (used with object), mused, musing.
3.
to meditate on.
4.
to comment thoughtfully or ruminate upon.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English musen to mutter, gaze meditatively on, be astonished < Middle French muser, perhaps ultimately derivative of Medieval Latin mūsum muzzle

muser, noun

mews, muse.


1. cogitate, ruminate, think; dream. 1, 3. ponder, contemplate, deliberate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To musing
Collins
World English Dictionary
muse1 (mjuːz)
 
vb (when intr, often foll by on or about)
1.  to reflect (about) or ponder (on), usually in silence
2.  (intr) to gaze thoughtfully
 
n
3.  archaic a state of abstraction
 
[C14: from Old French muser, perhaps from mus snout, from Medieval Latin mūsus]
 
'muser1
 
n
 
'museful1
 
adj
 
'musefully1
 
adv

muse2 (mjuːz)
 
n
a goddess that inspires a creative artist, esp a poet
 
[C14: from Old French, from Latin Mūsa, from Greek Mousa a Muse]

Muse (mjuːz)
 
n
Greek myth any of nine sister goddesses, each of whom was regarded as the protectress of a different art or science. Daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne, the nine are Calliope, Clio, Erato, Euterpe, Melpomene, Polyhymnia, Terpsichore, Thalia, and Urania

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

muse
"to be absorbed in thought," mid-14c., from O.Fr. muser (12c.) "to ponder, loiter, waste time," lit. "to stand with one's nose in the air" (or, possibly, "to sniff about" like a dog who has lost the scent), from muse "muzzle," from Gallo-Romance *musa "snout," of unknown origin. Probably influenced
in sense by muse (n.). Related: Mused; musing.

muse
late 14c., protectors of the arts, from L. Musa, from Gk. Mousa, lit. "muse, music, song," from PIE root *mon-/*men-/*mn- "to think, remember" (see mind (n.)). The names of the nine Muses, daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne (q.v.), and their specialties are traditionally: Calliope
(epic poetry), Clio (history), Erato (love poetry, lyric art), Euterpe (music, especially flute), Melpomene (tragedy), Polymnia (hymns), Terpsichore (dance), Thalia (comedy), Urania (astronomy).

musing
late 14c., "complaint," from prp. of muse (v.). Meaning "pondering" is from mid-15c. Related: Musingly; musings.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
Now the intellectuals can start musing about the hidden strengths that overcame
  all those too-evident weaknesses.
Especially the musing about using them as print-jets.
Anyway, it is pure philosophical musing to justify self obsessions.
Any dreamy, pen-chewing poet would feel at home there, musing on mortality.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature