mutiny

[myoot-n-ee]
noun, plural mutinies.
1.
revolt or rebellion against constituted authority, especially by sailors against their officers.
2.
rebellion against any authority.
verb (used without object), mutinied, mutinying.
3.
to commit the offense of mutiny; revolt against authority.

Origin:
1560–70; obsolete mutine to mutiny (< Middle French mutiner, derivative of mutin mutiny; see mutineer) + -y3

premutiny, noun, plural premutinies; verb (used with object), premutinied, premutinying.


2. uprising, overthrow, coup, takeover.
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World English Dictionary
mutiny (ˈmjuːtɪnɪ)
 
n , pl -nies
1.  open rebellion against constituted authority, esp by seamen or soldiers against their officers
 
vb , -nies, -nies, -nying, -nied
2.  (intr) to engage in mutiny
 
[C16: from obsolete mutine, from Old French mutin rebellious, from meute mutiny, ultimately from Latin movēre to move]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

mutiny
1560s, from obsolete verb mutine "revolt" (1540s), from M.Fr. mutiner "to revolt," from meutin "rebellious," from meute "a revolt, movement," from V.L. *movita "a military uprising," from fem. pp. of movere "to move" (see move). The verb is attested from 1580s. Related: Mutinied.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
It was financial mutiny.
They are ever on guard against the mutiny of too much emotion.
Even so, there's no sign of a mutiny for all this bounty.
Squelch that mutiny and tell them to toughen up.
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