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nurture

[nur-cher] /ˈnɜr tʃər/
verb (used with object), nurtured, nurturing.
1.
to feed and protect:
to nurture one's offspring.
2.
to support and encourage, as during the period of training or development; foster:
to nurture promising musicians.
3.
to bring up; train; educate.
noun
4.
rearing, upbringing, training, education, or the like.
5.
development:
the nurture of young artists.
6.
something that nourishes; nourishment; food.
Origin
1300-1350
1300-50; (noun) Middle English norture < Middle French, variant of nourriture < Late Latin nūtrītūra a nourishing, equivalent to Latin nūtrīt(us) (past participle of nūtrīre to feed, nourish) + -ūra -ure; (v.) derivative of the noun
Related forms
nurturable, adjective
nurtureless, adjective
nurturer, noun
unnurtured, adjective
well-nurtured, adjective
Synonyms
1, 3. See nurse.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for nurturing
  • Developing and nurturing a network is helpful in every aspect of your work.
  • Glia are nervous system caretakers whose nurturing can go too far.
  • Many of them expect you to be their nurturing mommy and cater to their every whim.
  • To me, that seems more important than any nurturing effect grannies may have.
  • They increase their genetic contribution not by promiscuity but by nurturing.
  • The arrangement is not without its nurturing aspects.
  • nurturing a core following is crucial for startups, which rely on word-of-mouth in lieu of costly advertising.
  • nurturing an attachment, even to the master of detachment, prevents spiritual growth.
  • At the same time, he appreciates that nurturing future leaders is crucial.
  • He will be remembered as a loving, kind and nurturing individual.
British Dictionary definitions for nurturing

nurture

/ˈnɜːtʃə/
noun
1.
the act or process of promoting the development, etc, of a child
2.
something that nourishes
3.
(biology) the environmental factors that partly determine the structure of an organism See also nature (sense 12)
verb (transitive)
4.
to feed or support
5.
to educate or train
Derived Forms
nurturable, adjective
nurturer, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French norriture, from Latin nutrīre to nourish
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for nurturing

nurture

n.

c.1300, "breeding, upbringing," from Old French norture, nourreture "food, nourishment; education, training," from Late Latin nutritia (see nursery).

v.

"to feed or nourish," early 15c., from nurture (n.). Related: Nurtured; nurturing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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