follow Dictionary.com

Why is the ninth month called September?

obstruct

[uh b-struhkt] /əbˈstrʌkt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to block or close up with an obstacle; make difficult to pass:
Debris obstructed the road.
2.
to interrupt, hinder, or oppose the passage, progress, course, etc., of.
3.
to block from sight; to be in the way of (a view, passage, etc.).
Origin
1605-1615
1605-15; < Latin obstructus (past participle of obstruere to build or pile up in the way, bar). See ob-, construct
Related forms
obstructedly, adverb
obstructer, obstructor, noun
obstructingly, adverb
obstructive, adjective
obstructively, adverb
obstructiveness, obstructivity
[ob-struhk-tiv-i-tee] /ˌɒb strʌkˈtɪv ɪ ti/ (Show IPA),
noun
nonobstructive, adjective
nonobstructively, adverb
nonobstructiveness, noun
preobstruct, verb (used with object)
unobstructed, adjective
unobstructive, adjective
Synonyms
1. stop, choke, clog, hinder, impede, prevent; check, slow, retard, arrest.
Antonyms
1. encourage, further.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples for obstructive
  • obstructive sleep apnea is also causally related to vascular complications such as hypertension.
  • Some of the common chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases are bronchitis, asthma and emphysema.
  • In doing so, however, it inevitably casts the lawyer in an obstructive role.
  • The word self-esteem has become one of the obstructive shibboleths of education.
  • Central sleep apnea is not the same as obstructive sleep apnea, which is due to a blockage in the airway.
  • People with a family history of obstructive sleep apnea are at increased risk of developing the condition.
  • About a third of patients with coronary artery disease also have obstructive sleep apnea.
  • Q--Please explain chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
  • And, as a horrified world offered help, the generals were obstructive.
  • The rebels, for their part, annoyed the impatient foreign delegates by not turning up and appeared obstructive.
British Dictionary definitions for obstructive

obstruct

/əbˈstrʌkt/
verb (transitive)
1.
to block (a road, passageway, etc) with an obstacle
2.
to make (progress or activity) difficult
3.
to impede or block a clear view of
Derived Forms
obstructor, noun
obstructive, adjective, noun
obstructively, adverb
obstructiveness, noun
Word Origin
C17: Latin obstructus built against, past participle of obstruere, from ob- against + struere to build
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for obstructive
adj.

1610s, from Latin obstruct-, past participle stem of obstruere (see obstruction) + -ive.

obstruct

v.

1610s, a back-formation from obstruction or else from Latin obstructus, past participle of obstruere "to block, to stop up" (see obstruction). Related: Obstructed; obstructing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
obstructive in Medicine

obstruct ob·struct (əb-strŭkt', ŏb-)
v. ob·struct·ed, ob·struct·ing, ob·structs
To block or close a body passage so as to hinder or interrupt a flow.


ob·struc'tive adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for obstruct

Some English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for obstructive

18
22
Scrabble Words With Friends