outcry

[n. out-krahy; v., out-krahy]
noun, plural outcries.
1.
a strong and usually public expression of protest, indignation, or the like.
2.
a crying out.
3.
loud clamor.
4.
an auction.
verb (used with object), outcried, outcrying.
5.
to outdo in crying; cry louder than.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English; see out-, cry


3. uproar, commotion.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
outcry
 
n , pl -cries
1.  a widespread or vehement protest
2.  clamour; uproar
3.  commerce a method of trading in which dealers shout out bids and offers at a prearranged meeting: sale by open outcry
 
vb , -cries, -cries, -crying, -cried
4.  (tr) to cry louder or make more noise than (someone or something)

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

outcry
1382, "act of crying aloud," from out + cry (q.v.). In metaphoric sense of "public protest," first attested 1911 in George Bernard Shaw.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The outcry over this epidemic, until recently, has been muted.
The public outcry against the planned hunt was so intense that it was canceled.
Amid public outcry and government regulations, companies are spending millions
  to clean up the ponds and reclaim the land.
As with onshore wind farms, there is frequent public outcry over the placement
  of power pylons.
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