overload

[v. oh-ver-lohd; n. oh-ver-lohd]
verb (used with object)
1.
to load to excess; overburden: Don't overload the raft or it will sink.
noun
2.
an excessive load.

Origin:
1545–55; over- + load

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
overload
 
vb
1.  (tr) to put too large a load on or in
 
n
2.  an excessive load

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

overload
1553, "to load with too great a burden," from over + load (q.v.). The noun is attested from 1645; of electrical current, from 1904.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The trick isn't to cut time on our devices, but to avoid information overload
  and content that makes us unhappy.
There is a danger, in short, of information overload.
Many of the systemic flaws are due less to corruption than to judicial overload.
The show's ratings have never been great, though, and it's now in danger of
  unseemly guest-star overload.
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