oversee

[oh-ver-see]
verb (used with object), oversaw, overseen, overseeing.
1.
to direct (work or workers); supervise; manage: He was hired to oversee the construction crews.
2.
to see or observe secretly or unintentionally: We happened to oversee the burglar leaving the premises. He was overseen stealing the letters.
3.
to survey or watch, as from a higher position.
4.
to look over; examine; inspect.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English overseen, Old English ofersēon. See over-, see1

overlook, oversee, oversight.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
oversee (ˌəʊvəˈsiː)
 
vb , -sees, -seeing, -saw, -seen
1.  to watch over and direct; supervise
2.  to watch secretly or accidentally

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

oversee
O.E. oferseon "to look down upon, keep watch over," from ofer "over" + seon "to see" (see see). Meaning "to supervise" is attested from mid-15c. The verb lacks the double sense of similar overlook (q.v.), but this emerges in the noun form oversight.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Oversee preparation and implementation of development communication strategies.
It also would establish a new agency to oversee consumer lending.
Hired, scheduled, and trained staff to oversee lab and provide support to users.
It is the religious authorities that oversee marriage, divorce and inheritance.
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