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pine1

[pahyn] /paɪn/
noun
1.
any evergreen, coniferous tree of the genus Pinus, having long, needle-shaped leaves, certain species of which yield timber, turpentine, tar, pitch, etc.
Compare pine family.
2.
any of various similar coniferous trees.
3.
the wood of the pine tree.
4.
Informal. the pineapple.
Origin
1000
before 1000; Middle English; Old English pīn < Latin pīnus
Related forms
pinelike, adjective

pine2

[pahyn] /paɪn/
verb (used without object), pined, pining.
1.
to yearn deeply; suffer with longing; long painfully (often followed by for):
to pine for one's home and family.
2.
to fail gradually in health or vitality from grief, regret, or longing (often followed by away):
Separated by their families, the lovers pined away.
3.
Archaic. to be discontented; fret.
verb (used with object), pined, pining.
4.
Archaic. to suffer grief or regret over.
noun
5.
Archaic. painful longing.
Origin
before 900; Middle English pinen to torture, torment, inflict pain, be in pain; Old English pīnian to torture, derivative of pīn torture (Middle English pine) < Late Latin pēna, Latin poena punishment. See pain
Synonyms
1. See yearn. 2. dwindle, decline, languish, droop, waste.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for pine
  • The long workbench and shelving in this garage are made from sections of a yellow pine bowling-alley lane.
  • We are a long way from the high desert home of the piñon pine.
  • Understanding, and then altering, the genes of a big pine tree is more complex than creating a better tomato.
  • pine cones stay warmer than the needles around them.
  • Some of us pine for that car that folds up into a suitcase.
  • Members of this genus are alternate hosts to white pine blister more add to my plant list enlarge.
  • Go for a walk around the block and step on every pine cone or crunchy leaf.
  • Here the terrain inclines from saguaro forests into nearly pristine woodlands of oak and pine.
  • pine trees in expanding populations have shorter generation times and smaller, more dispersive seeds.
  • They were also crawling over a pile of pine branches that came down as a result of a storm.
British Dictionary definitions for pine

pine1

/paɪn/
noun
1.
any evergreen resinous coniferous tree of the genus Pinus, of the N hemisphere, with long needle-shaped leaves and brown cones: family Pinaceae See also longleaf pine, nut pine, pitch pine, Scots pine
2.
any other tree or shrub of the family Pinaceae
3.
the wood of any of these trees
4.
any of various similar but unrelated plants, such as ground pine and screw pine
Word Origin
Old English pīn, from Latin pīnus pine

pine2

/paɪn/
verb
1.
(intransitive; often foll by for or an infinitive) to feel great longing or desire; yearn
2.
(intransitive) often foll by away. to become ill, feeble, or thin through worry, longing, etc
3.
(transitive) (archaic) to mourn or grieve for
Word Origin
Old English pīnian to torture, from pīn pain, from Medieval Latin pēna, from Latin poenapain

Pine

/paɪn/
noun
1.
Courtney. born 1964, British jazz saxophonist and clarinettist
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for pine
n.

"coniferous tree," Old English pin (in compounds), from Old French pin and directly from Latin pinus "pine, pine-tree, fir-tree," perhaps in reference to the sap or pitch, from PIE *peie- "to be fat, swell" (see fat (adj.)). Cf. Sanskrit pituh "juice, sap, resin," pitudaruh "pine tree," Greek pitys "pine tree." Also cf. pitch (n.1). Pine-top "cheap illicit whiskey," first recorded 1858, Southern U.S. slang. Pine-needle (n.) attested from 1866.

v.

Old English pinian "to torture, torment, afflict, cause to suffer," from *pine "pain, torture, punishment," possibly ultimately from Latin poena "punishment, penalty," from Greek poine (see penal). A Latin word borrowed into Germanic (cf. Middle Dutch pinen, Old High German pinon, German Pein, Old Norse pina) with Christianity. Intransitive sense of "to languish, waste away," the main modern meaning, is first recorded early 14c. Related: Pined; pining.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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pine in Technology

Program for Internet News & Email. A tool for reading, sending, and managing electronic messages. It was designed specifically with novice computer users in mind, but can be tailored to accommodate the needs of "power users" as well. Pine uses Internet message protocols (e.g. RFC 822, SMTP, MIME, IMAP, NNTP) and runs under Unix and MS-DOS.
The guiding principles for Pine's user-interface were: careful limitation of features, one-character mnemonic commands, always-present command menus, immediate user feedback, and high tolerance for user mistakes. It is intended that Pine can be learned by exploration rather than reading manuals. Feedback from the University of Washington community and a growing number of Internet sites has been encouraging.
Pine's message composition editor, Pico, is also available as a separate stand-alone program. Pico is a very simple and easy-to-use text editor offering paragraph justification, cut/paste, and a spelling checker.
Pine features on-line help; a message index showing a message summary which includes the status, sender, size, date and subject of messages; commands to view and process messages; a message composer with easy-to-use editor and spelling checker; an address book for saving long complex addresses and personal distribution lists under a nickname; message attachments via Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions; folder management commands for creating, deleting, listing, or renaming message folders; access to remote message folders and archives via the Interactive Mail Access Protocol as defined in RFC 1176; access to Usenet news via NNTP or IMAP.
Pine, Pico and UW's IMAP server are copyrighted but freely available.
Unix Pine runs on Ultrix, AIX, SunOS, SVR4 and PTX. PC-Pine is available for Packet Driver, Novell LWP, FTP PC/TCP and Sun PC/NFS. A Microsoft Windows/WinSock version is planned, as are extensions for off-line use.
Pine was originally based on Elm but has evolved much since ("Pine Is No-longer Elm"). Pine is the work of Mike Seibel, Mark Crispin, Steve Hubert, Sheryl Erez, David Miller and Laurence Lundblade (now at Virginia Tech) at the University of Washington Office of Computing and Communications.
(ftp://ftp.cac.washington.edu/mail/pine.tar.Z). (telnet://demo.cac.washington.edu/) (login as "pinedemo").
E-mail: , pine-info-request@cac.washington.edu, pine-announce-request@cac.washington.edu.
(21 Sep 93)
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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