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pleading

[plee-ding] /ˈpli dɪŋ/
noun
1.
the act of a person who pleads.
2.
Law.
  1. the advocating of a cause in a court of law.
  2. the art or science of setting forth or drawing pleas in legal causes.
  3. a formal statement, usually written, setting forth the cause of action or defense of a case.
  4. pleadings, the successive statements delivered alternately by plaintiff and defendant until the issue is joined.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English pledynge (gerund). See plead, -ing1
Related forms
pleadingly, adverb
pleadingness, noun
nonpleading, adjective
nonpleadingly, adverb
unpleading, adjective

plead

[pleed] /plid/
verb (used without object), pleaded or pled, pleading.
1.
to appeal or entreat earnestly:
to plead for time.
2.
to use arguments or persuasions, as with a person, for or against something:
She pleaded with him not to take the job.
3.
to afford an argument or appeal:
His youth pleads for him.
4.
Law.
  1. to make any allegation or plea in an action at law.
  2. to put forward an answer on the part of a defendant to a legal declaration or charge.
  3. to address a court as an advocate.
  4. Obsolete. to prosecute a suit or action at law.
verb (used with object), pleaded or pled, pleading.
5.
to allege or urge in defense, justification, or excuse:
to plead ignorance.
6.
Law.
  1. to maintain (a cause) by argument before a court.
  2. to allege or set forth (something) formally in an action at law.
  3. to allege or cite in legal defense:
    to plead a statute of limitations.
Origin
1200-50; Middle English plaiden < Old French plaid(i)er to go to law, plead < early Medieval Latin placitāre to litigate, derivative of Latin placitum opinion. See plea
Related forms
replead, verb, repleaded, repleading.
unpleaded, adjective
Synonyms
1. beg, supplicate. 2. reason. 5. claim.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for pleading
  • Individuals judged pleading purrs as more urgent and less pleasant than normal purrs.
  • Many are still waiting, but some morning soon they too will wake to the lilt of a backyard bird pleading for a mate.
  • You're the instructor, and students are crowding the lectern, pleading for study advice for the midterm.
  • But near-incoherent writing is what it is, and not exempt from criticism because of special pleading.
  • Its owner was later sentenced to five years in prison after pleading guilty to fraud and tax-evasion charges.
  • Let's not get mired down in a discussion and special pleading over the increase in technology costs.
  • While pleading on almost every page for the rights of the poor, he has no sentimental pity for the idle vagrant.
  • In the pleading of cases nothing pleases so much as brevity.
  • The rest of the family swarmed around us, cajoling and pleading.
  • For a homeopathic preparation to be taken seriously, it has to stand on its merits, not on any special pleading.
British Dictionary definitions for pleading

pleading

/ˈpliːdɪŋ/
noun (law)
1.
the act of presenting a case in court, as by a lawyer on behalf of his client
2.
the art or science of preparing the formal written statements of the parties to a legal action See also pleadings

plead

/pliːd/
verb pleads, pleading, pleaded, plead (plɛd), especially (US & Scot) pled (plɛd)
1.
when intr, often foll by with. to appeal earnestly or humbly (to)
2.
(transitive; may take a clause as object) to give as an excuse; offer in justification or extenuation: to plead ignorance, he pleaded that he was insane
3.
(intransitive) often foll by for. to provide an argument or appeal (for): her beauty pleads for her
4.
(law) to declare oneself to be (guilty or not guilty) in answer to the charge
5.
(law) to advocate (a case) in a court of law
6.
(intransitive) (law)
  1. to file pleadings
  2. to address a court as an advocate
Derived Forms
pleadable, adjective
pleader, noun
Word Origin
C13: from Old French plaidier, from Medieval Latin placitāre to have a lawsuit, from Latin placēre to please; see plea
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for pleading
n.

late 13c., "the carrying on of a suit at court," verbal noun from plead (v.). Meaning "supplication, intercession" is from early 15c.

plead

v.

mid-13c., "make a plea in court," from Anglo-French pleder, Old French plaidier, "plead at court" (11c.), from Medieval Latin placitare, from Late Latin placitum (see plea). Sense of "request, beg" first recorded late 14c. Related: Pleaded; pleading; pleadingly.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Article for pleading

in law, written presentation by a litigant in a lawsuit setting forth the facts upon which he claims legal relief or challenges the claims of his opponent. A pleading includes claims and counterclaims but not the evidence by which the litigant intends to prove his case.

Learn more about pleading with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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