plentiful

[plen-ti-fuhl]
adjective
1.
existing in great plenty: Coal was plentiful, and therefore cheap, in that region.
2.
yielding abundantly: a plentiful source of inspiration.

Origin:
1425–75; late Middle English; see plenty, -ful

plentifully, adverb
plentifulness, noun
overplentiful, adjective
overplentifully, adverb
overplentifulness, noun
quasi-plentiful, adjective
quasi-plentifully, adverb
unplentiful, adjective
unplentifully, adverb

planetary, plenary, plentiful, plenitude.


1. Plentiful, ample, abundant, bountiful describe a more than adequate supply of something. Plentiful suggests an over-adequate quantity: a plentiful supply. Ample suggests a more than adequate quality as well: to give ample praise. Abundant implies a greater degree of plenty, and bountiful a still more ample quality as well: an abundant, even a bountiful, harvest. 2. fruitful, bounteous, productive; luxuriant.


1. sparse, scanty. 2. barren, fruitless, sterile.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
plentiful (ˈplɛntɪfʊl)
 
adj
1.  ample; abundant
2.  having or yielding an abundance: a plentiful year
 
'plentifully
 
adv
 
'plentifulness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Example sentences
Some professors want to go where research collaborations are more plentiful.
If no grandparents are available, nannies are plentiful and affordable.
Peace and plentiful land attract refugees from troubled neighboring countries.
These little butterflies are plentiful and tiny-some are no larger than my
  thumb-and share similar markings across species.
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