poesy

[poh-uh-see, -zee]
noun, plural poesies.
1.
the work or the art of poetic composition.
2.
Archaic.
a.
poetry in general.
b.
verse or poetry in metrical form.
3.
Obsolete.
a.
a poem or verse used as a motto. Compare posy ( def 2 ).
b.
a poem.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English poesie < Middle French < Latin poēsis < Greek poíēsis poetic art, poetry, literally, a making, equivalent to poiē-, variant stem of poieîn to make + -sis -sis

poesy, posey, posy.
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World English Dictionary
poesy (ˈpəʊɪzɪ)
 
n , pl -sies
1.  an archaic word for poetry
2.  poetic the art of writing poetry
3.  archaic, poetic or a poem or verse, esp one used as a motto
 
[C14: via Old French from Latin poēsis, from Greek, from poiēsis poetic art, creativity, from poiein to make]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

poesy
c.1300, from O.Fr. poesie, from V.L. poesia, from L. poesis "poetry," from Gk. poesis "composition, poetry," from poein "to make or compose" (see poet).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Admiration signifies poesy, and a chance to employ a fertile skill at it drives him to ecstasy, then past it.
The elegancy, facility, and golden cadence of poesy.
There must be something irresistibly attractive in poesy, though.
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