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prevailing

[pri-vey-ling] /prɪˈveɪ lɪŋ/
adjective
1.
predominant:
prevailing winds.
2.
generally current:
the prevailing opinion.
3.
having superior power or influence.
4.
Origin
1580-1590
1580-90; prevail + -ing2
Related forms
prevailingly, adverb
prevailingness, noun
unprevailing, adjective
Synonyms
1. preponderant, preponderating, dominant; prevalent. 2. common. See current. 4. effective.
Antonyms
2. rare.

prevail

[pri-veyl] /prɪˈveɪl/
verb (used without object)
1.
to be widespread or current; exist everywhere or generally:
Silence prevailed along the funeral route.
2.
to appear or occur as the more important or frequent feature or element; predominate:
Green tints prevail in the upholstery.
3.
to be or prove superior in strength, power, or influence (usually followed by over):
They prevailed over their enemies in the battle.
4.
to succeed; become dominant; win out:
to wish that the right side might prevail.
5.
to use persuasion or inducement successfully:
He prevailed upon us to accompany him.
Origin
1350-1400; Middle English prevayllen to grow very strong < Latin praevalēre to be more able, equivalent to prae- pre- + valēre to be strong; see prevalent
Related forms
prevailer, noun
Synonyms
2. preponderate. 3. overcome.
Antonyms
3. lose.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for prevailing
  • The prevailing view holds that self-replication is an ability that organisms or objects either have in full or lack entirely.
  • Contrary to prevailing wisdom, large earthquakes can interact in unexpected ways.
  • The prevailing medical wisdom, he explained to her, was that she would inevitably die in a year or maybe two.
  • For locals, the discovery reinforced prevailing wisdom that this arid land exists beyond the raking claws of time.
  • Many of the loans have rates that fluctuate, so costs for those borrowers will go up when prevailing interest rates rise.
  • So far, that approach is prevailing in debt negotiations.
  • But the prevailing mood has swung way too far towards pessimism.
  • Features include subtle border coloring on land, and prevailing winds and ocean currents at sea.
  • One prevailing view of addiction holds that alcohol and other drugs alter the way dopamine works in the brain.
  • He calculated potential dirigible routes based on prevailing sea lanes.
British Dictionary definitions for prevailing

prevailing

/prɪˈveɪlɪŋ/
adjective
1.
generally accepted; widespread: the prevailing opinion
2.
most frequent or conspicuous; predominant: the prevailing wind is from the north
Derived Forms
prevailingly, adverb

prevail

/prɪˈveɪl/
verb (intransitive)
1.
often foll by over or against. to prove superior; gain mastery: skill will prevail
2.
to be or appear as the most important feature; be prevalent
3.
to exist widely; be in force
4.
often foll by on or upon. to succeed in persuading or inducing
Derived Forms
prevailer, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Latin praevalēre to be superior in strength, from prae beyond + valēre to be strong
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for prevailing
adj.

1590s, "vigorous;" 1680s, "widely accepted," present participle adjective from prevail (v.).

prevail

v.

c.1400, "be successful; be efficacious," from Old French prevaleir (Modern French prévaloir) and directly from Latin praevalere "be stronger, have greater power," from prae "before" (see pre-) + valere "have power, be strong" (see valiant). Spelling in English perhaps influenced by avail. Related: Prevailed; prevailing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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