probate

[proh-beyt]
noun
1.
Law. the official proving of a will as authentic or valid in a probate court.
2.
an officially certified copy of a will so proved.
adjective
3.
of or pertaining to probate or a probate court.
verb (used with object), probated, probating.
4.
to establish the authenticity or validity of (a will).
5.
Law. to put (an offender) on probation.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English probat < Latin probātum a thing approved, noun use of neuter past participle of probāre to test and find good; see probe, -ate1

unprobated, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
probate (ˈprəʊbɪt, -beɪt)
 
n
1.  the act or process of officially proving the authenticity and validity of a will
2.  a.  the official certificate stating a will to be genuine and conferring on the executors power to administer the estate
 b.  the probate copy of a will
3.  (in the US) all matters within the jurisdiction of a probate court
4.  (modifier) of, relating to, or concerned with probate: probate value; a probate court
 
vb
5.  chiefly (US), (Canadian) (tr) to establish officially the authenticity and validity of (a will)
 
[C15: from Latin probāre to inspect]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

probate
"official proving of a will," 1463, from L. probatum "a thing proved," neut. of probatus, pp. of probare "to try, test, prove" (see prove). The verb is recorded from 1792.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
What the executrix in that situation has to face otherwise is between her and
  the probate court.
By making the gift, you may reduce future estate taxes and probate costs.
That's where you put your money that is in excess of the exemption from estate
  and probate taxes and fees.
The use of a revocable living trust is often touted as a way to avoid the time
  and expense of probate.
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