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proceeding

[pruh-see-ding] /prəˈsi dɪŋ/
noun
1.
a particular action or course or manner of action.
2.
proceedings, a series of activities or events; happenings.
3.
the act of a person or thing that proceeds:
Our proceeding down the mountain was hindered by mud slides.
4.
proceedings, a record of the doings or transactions of a fraternal, academic, etc., society.
5.
proceedings, Law.
  1. the instituting or carrying on of an action at law.
  2. a legal step or measure:
    to institute proceedings against a person.
Origin
late Middle English
1375-1425
1375-1425; late Middle English; see proceed, -ing1
Synonyms
1, 2, 4. See process.

proceed

[v. pruh-seed; n. proh-seed] /v. prəˈsid; n. ˈproʊ sid/
verb (used without object)
1.
to move or go forward or onward, especially after stopping.
2.
to carry on or continue any action or process.
3.
to go on to do something.
4.
to continue one's discourse.
5.
Law.
  1. to begin and carry on a legal action.
  2. to take legal action (usually followed by against).
6.
to be carried on, as an action or process.
7.
to go or come forth; issue (often followed by from).
8.
to arise, originate, or result (usually followed by from).
noun
9.
proceeds.
  1. something that results or accrues.
  2. the total amount derived from a sale or other transaction:
    The proceeds from the deal were divided equally among us.
  3. the profits or returns from a sale, investment, etc.
10.
Archaic. proceeds.
Origin
1350-1400; Middle English procede < Latin prōcēdere. See pro-1, cede
Related forms
proceeder, noun
reproceed, verb (used without object)
Can be confused
precede, proceed.
Synonyms
1. progress, continue, pass on. See advance. 7. emanate. 8. spring, ensue.
Antonyms
1. recede.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for proceeding
  • People have been sent to jail without a guilty plea or a trial, or tossed from their homes without a proper proceeding.
  • These teachers are proceeding along the same path that led philosophers, a few decades ago, to abandon inspiration for.
  • Sorely needed economic reform is proceeding far too crabbily.
  • Learn about the events proceeding the impeachment.
  • Global warming is proceeding much faster than anticipated at the poles.
  • proceeding down the scale leads one inexorably to yocto-, a metric prefix meaning one-septillionth.
  • Look over the battery, and if you notice any fluid or gas leaking from it, think twice about proceeding.
  • By proceeding with the online application you understand and accept this process.
  • Pharmaceutical companies have expressed interest in the chips but are proceeding with caution.
  • Development is proceeding smoothly now, with the framework now beginning to take shape.
British Dictionary definitions for proceeding

proceeding

/prəˈsiːdɪŋ/
noun
1.
an act or course of action
2.
  1. the institution of a legal action
  2. any step taken in a legal action
3.
(pl) the minutes of the meetings of a club, society, etc
4.
(pl) legal action; litigation
5.
(pl) the events of an occasion, meeting, etc

proceed

/prəˈsiːd/
verb (intransitive)
1.
(often foll by to) to advance or carry on, esp after stopping
2.
(often foll by with) to undertake and continue (something or to do something): he proceeded with his reading
3.
(often foll by against) to institute or carry on a legal action
4.
to emerge or originate; arise: evil proceeds from the heart
See also proceeds
Derived Forms
proceeder, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Latin prōcēdere to advance, from pro-1 + cēdere to go
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for proceeding
n.

1510s, "action of going forward," verbal noun from proceed (v.). From 1550s as "what is done, conduct." Proceedings "records of the doings of a society" is attested by 1824.

proceed

v.

late 14c., "to go on," also "to emanate from, result from," from Old French proceder (13c., Modern French procéder) and directly from Latin procedere (past participle processus) "go before, go forward, advance, make progress; come forward," from pro- "forward" (see pro-) + cedere "to go" (see cede). Related: Proceeded; proceeding.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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