prodigious

[pruh-dij-uhs]
adjective
1.
extraordinary in size, amount, extent, degree, force, etc.: a prodigious research grant.
2.
wonderful or marvelous: a prodigious feat.
3.
abnormal; monstrous.
4.
Obsolete, ominous.

Origin:
1545–55; < Latin prōdigiōsus marvelous. See prodigy, -ous

prodigiously, adverb
prodigiousness, noun
unprodigious, adjective
unprodigiously, adverb
unprodigiousness, noun

prodigious, prestigious.


1. enormous, immense, huge, gigantic, tremendous. 2. amazing, stupendous, astounding, wondrous, miraculous.


1. tiny. 2. ordinary.
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World English Dictionary
prodigious (prəˈdɪdʒəs)
 
adj
1.  vast in size, extent, power, etc
2.  wonderful or amazing
3.  obsolete threatening
 
[C16: from Latin prōdigiōsus marvellous, from prōdigium, see prodigy]
 
pro'digiously
 
adv
 
pro'digiousness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

prodigious
1550s, "having the appearance of a prodigy," from L. prodigiosus "strange, wonderful, marvelous," from prodigium (see prodigy). Meaning "vast, enormous" is from c.1600.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The legal costs involved in this enormous litigation could be prodigious.
The two species are larger than native white-clawed crayfish and are more
  prodigious hunters.
He couldn't recapture the loneliness and the idealism that had once been the
  source of his prodigious concentration.
In a world of seductive illusions, they became revolutionaries by championing
  the prodigious chaos of the actual world.
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