proffer

[prof-er]
verb (used with object)
1.
to put before a person for acceptance; offer.
noun
2.
the act of proffering.
3.
an offer or proposal.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English profren < Anglo-French profrer, variant of Old French poroffrir, equivalent to por- pro-1 + offrir to offer

profferer, noun
unproffered, adjective


1. volunteer, propose, suggest. See offer.
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World English Dictionary
proffer (ˈprɒfə)
 
vb
1.  (tr) to offer for acceptance; tender
 
n
2.  the act of proffering
 
[C13: from Old French proffrir, from pro-1 + offrir to offer]
 
'profferer
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

proffer
late 13c., from Anglo-Fr. profrier (mid-13c.), O.Fr. poroffrir (c.1080), from por- "forth" (from L. pro-) + offrir "to offer," from L. offerre (see offer).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Meals are available, and the owner is happy to proffer information about the
  city.
They will be reluctant to proffer lots more money until they are sure it will
  be handed out in that spirit.
Any well-briefed attorney could proffer evidence to the contrary.
Respondents proffer seven state interests they claim are compelling.
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