profligate

[prof-li-git, -geyt]
adjective
1.
utterly and shamelessly immoral or dissipated; thoroughly dissolute.
2.
recklessly prodigal or extravagant.
noun
3.
a profligate person.

Origin:
1525–35; < Latin prōflīgātus broken down in character, degraded, orig. past participle of prōflīgāre to shatter, debase, equivalent to prō- pro-1 + -flīgāre, derivative of flīgere to strike; see inflict, -ate1

profligately, adverb
profligateness, noun


1. abandoned, licentious.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
profligate (ˈprɒflɪɡɪt)
 
adj
1.  shamelessly immoral or debauched
2.  wildly extravagant or wasteful
 
n
3.  a profligate person
 
[C16: from Latin prōflīgātus corrupt, from prōflīgāre to overthrow, from pro-1 + flīgere to beat]
 
profligacy
 
n
 
'profligately
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

profligate
1526, "overthrown" (implied in profligation), from L. profligatus "destroyed, dissolute," pp. of profligare "to cast down, defeat, ruin," from pro- "down, forth" + fligere "to strike" (see afflict). Meaning "recklessly extravagant" is 1779, via notion of "ruined by vice" (1647).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The curse of broadcast technologies is that they are profligate users of
  limited resources.
It's easy to dismiss people who would bankroll these projects as profligate
  spend-alls.
They are pleased by his judicial appointments but mystified by his profligate
  spending.
The writer so wary of self-indulgence was profligate with ink and paper.
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