prolong

[pruh-lawng, -long]
verb (used with object)
1.
to lengthen out in time; extend the duration of; cause to continue longer: to prolong one's stay abroad.
2.
to make longer in spatial extent: to prolong a line.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English prolongen < Late Latin prōlongāre to lengthen, equivalent to prō- pro-1 + long(us) long1 + -ā- theme vowel + -re infinitive ending

prolongable, adjective
prolongableness, noun
prolongably, adverb
prolonger, noun
prolongment, noun
unprolongable, adjective
unprolonged, adjective
well-prolonged, adjective


1. See lengthen.


1. abbreviate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
prolong (prəˈlɒŋ)
 
vb
(tr) to lengthen in duration or space; extend
 
[C15: from Late Latin prōlongāre to extend, from Latin pro-1 + longus long]
 
prolongation
 
n
 
pro'longer
 
n
 
pro'longment
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

prolong
1412, from O.Fr. prolonguer (13c.), from L.L. prolongare "to prolong, extend," from L. pro- "forth" + longus "long" (adj.) (see long (adj.)).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Call your health care provider if you have prolonged or severe flank pain, or
  if you suspect hydronephrosis.
At every table, plugs should be supplied to allow prolonged laptop use.
Staring at recession, policymakers in rich economies are considering how to
  avoid a prolonged slump.
In places where there have been prolonged heat exposures, there is probably a
  broad impact on many organ systems.
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