prone

1 [prohn]
adjective
1.
having a natural inclination or tendency to something; disposed; liable: to be prone to anger.
2.
having the front or ventral part downward; lying face downward.
3.
lying flat; prostrate.
4.
having a downward direction or slope.
5.
having the palm downward, as the hand.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Latin prōnus turned or leaning forward, inclined downward, disposed, prone

pronely, adverb
proneness, noun


1. apt, subject, tending. 3. recumbent.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

prone

2 [prohn]
noun
a sermon or a brief hortatory introduction to a sermon, usually delivered at a service at which the Eucharist is celebrated.

Origin:
1660–70; < French prône grill, grating (separating chancel from nave); so called because notices and addresses were delivered there

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
prone (prəʊn)
 
adj
1.  lying flat or face downwards; prostrate
2.  sloping or tending downwards
3.  having an inclination to do something
 
[C14: from Latin prōnus bent forward, from pro-1]
 
'pronely
 
adv
 
'proneness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

prone
1382, "naturally inclined to something, apt, liable," from L. pronus "bent forward, inclined to," from adverbial form of pro- "forward." Meaning "lying face-down" is first recorded 1578. Both lit. and fig. senses were in L.; fig. is older in Eng.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

prone (prōn)
adj.

  1. Lying with the front or face downward.

  2. Having a tendency; inclined.

adv.
In a prone manner.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
Prone to the same diseases as fruiting apples, so shop for disease-resistant varieties.
Food is a basic human need and humans are prone to unusual behavior.
So the remaining monolithic milk-heavy herd is prone to diseases.
Grad students are notoriously neurotic and prone to obsess over doing exactly
  what we're told.
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