prophecy

[prof-uh-see]
noun, plural prophecies.
1.
the foretelling or prediction of what is to come.
2.
something that is declared by a prophet, especially a divinely inspired prediction, instruction, or exhortation.
3.
a divinely inspired utterance or revelation: oracular prophecies.
4.
the action, function, or faculty of a prophet.

Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English prophecie < Old French < Late Latin prophētīa < Greek prophēteía. See prophet, -y3

prophecy, prophesy.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
prophecy (ˈprɒfɪsɪ)
 
n , pl -cies
1.  a.  a message of divine truth revealing God's will
 b.  the act of uttering such a message
2.  a prediction or guess
3.  the function, activity, or charismatic endowment of a prophet or prophets
 
[C13: ultimately from Greek prophētēsprophet]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

prophecy
early 13c., "function of a prophet," from O.Fr. profecie (12c.), from L.L. prophetia, from Gk. prophetia "gift of interpreting the will of the gods," from prophetes (see prophet). Meaning "thing spoken or written by a prophet" is from c.1300. The verb prophesy is recorded from late 14c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Prophecy definition


or prediction, was one of the functions of the prophet. It has been defined as a "miracle of knowledge, a declaration or description or representation of something future, beyond the power of human sagacity to foresee, discern, or conjecture." (See PROPHET.) The great prediction which runs like a golden thread through the whole contents of the Old Testament is that regarding the coming and work of the Messiah; and the great use of prophecy was to perpetuate faith in his coming, and to prepare the world for that event. But there are many subordinate and intermediate prophecies also which hold an important place in the great chain of events which illustrate the sovereignty and all-wise overruling providence of God. Then there are many prophecies regarding the Jewish nation, its founder Abraham (Gen. 12:1-3; 13:16; 15:5; 17:2, 4-6, etc.), and his posterity, Isaac and Jacob and their descendants (12:7; 13:14, 15, 17; 15:18-21; Ex. 3:8, 17), which have all been fulfilled. The twenty-eighth chapter of Deuteronomy contains a series of predictions which are even now in the present day being fulfilled. In the writings of the prophets Isaiah (2:18-21), Jeremiah (27:3-7; 29:11-14), Ezekiel (5:12; 8), Daniel (8; 9:26, 27), Hosea (9:17), there are also many prophecies regarding the events which were to befall that people. There is in like manner a large number of prophecies relating to those nations with which the Jews came into contact, as Tyre (Ezek. 26:3-5, 14-21), Egypt (Ezek. 29:10, 15; 30:6, 12, 13), Ethiopia (Nahum 3:8-10), Nineveh (Nahum 1:10; 2:8-13; 3:17-19), Babylon (Isa. 13:4; Jer. 51:7; Isa. 44:27; Jer. 50:38; 51:36, 39, 57), the land of the Philistines (Jer. 47:4-7; Ezek. 25:15-17; Amos 1:6-8; Zeph. 2:4-7; Zech. 9:5-8), and of the four great monarchies (Dan. 2:39, 40; 7:17-24; 8:9). But the great body of Old Testament prophecy relates directly to the advent of the Messiah, beginning with Gen. 3:15, the first great promise, and extending in ever-increasing fulness and clearness all through to the very close of the canon. The Messianic prophecies are too numerous to be quoted. "To him gave all the prophets witness." (Comp. Micah 5:2; Hag. 2:6-9; Isa. 7:14; 9:6, 7; 11:1, 2; 53; 60:10, 13; Ps. 16:11; 68:18.) Many predictions also were delivered by Jesus and his apostles. Those of Christ were very numerous. (Comp. Matt. 10:23:24; 11:23; 19:28; 21:43, 44; 24; 25:31-46; 26:17-35, 46, 64; Mark 9:1; 10:30; 13; 11:1-6, 14; 14:12-31, 42, 62; 16:17, etc.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

prophecy

in religion, a divinely inspired revelation or interpretation. Although prophecy is perhaps most commonly associated with Judaism and Christianity, it is found throughout the religions of the world, both ancient and modern

Learn more about prophecy with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
If you go into interviews with a negative perception of your teaching ability,
  that will become a self-fulfilling prophecy.
Flatly, the idea is a self-fulfilling prophecy, pure drivel.
They cited references in the story that the day of the prophecy was a new moon,
  which would be true of an eclipse.
For them prophecy is an everyday reality, and many independent denominations
  trace their foundation to direct prophetic authority.
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