prostrate

[pros-treyt]
verb (used with object), prostrated, prostrating.
1.
to cast (oneself) face down on the ground in humility, submission, or adoration.
2.
to lay flat, as on the ground.
3.
to throw down level with the ground.
4.
to overthrow, overcome, or reduce to helplessness.
5.
to reduce to physical weakness or exhaustion.
adjective
6.
lying flat or at full length, as on the ground.
7.
lying face down on the ground, as in token of humility, submission, or adoration.
8.
overthrown, overcome, or helpless: a country left prostrate by natural disasters.
9.
physically weak or exhausted.
11.
utterly dejected or depressed; disconsolate.
12.
Botany. (of a plant or stem) lying flat on the ground.

Origin:
1350–1400; (adj.) Middle English prostrat < Latin prōstrātus, past participle of prōsternere to throw prone, equivalent to prō- pro-1 + strā-, variant stem of sternere to stretch out + -tus past participle suffix; (v.) Middle English prostraten, derivative of the adj.

prostrative [pros-truh-tiv] , adjective
prostrator, noun
unprostrated, adjective

1. prone, prostate, prostrate, supine ; 2. prostate, prostrate.


6. prone, supine, recumbent.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
prostrate
 
adj
1.  lying with the face downwards, as in submission
2.  exhausted physically or emotionally
3.  helpless or defenceless
4.  (of a plant) growing closely along the ground
 
vb
5.  to bow or cast (oneself) down, as in submission
6.  to lay or throw down flat, as on the ground
7.  to make helpless or defenceless
8.  to make exhausted
 
[C14: from Latin prōsternere to throw to the ground, from prō- before + sternere to lay low]
 
pros'tration
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

prostrate
c.1380, from L. prostratus, pp. of prosternere "strew in front, throw down," from pro- "forth" + sternere "to spread out," from PIE base *stere- "to spread, extend, stretch out" (see structure). The verb is attested from c.1400, from the adj. Prostration "action of prostrating
oneself" is from 1526; meaning "weakness, exhaustion, dejection" is from 1651.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
prostrate   (prŏs'trāt')  Pronunciation Key 
Growing flat along the ground. Creeping jenny, pennyroyal, and many species of ivy have a prostrate growth habit.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
To develop a more prostrate form, cut vertical stems back to the plant's main stem.
There was a quick dance of their lithe grey-figured bodies over the clumsy, prostrate figure.
Each limb, each muscle, each fibre of the huge prostrate body was twisted and turned in every direction.
Tread silently round the hapless couch of the poor prostrate soul.
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