provenance

[prov-uh-nuhns, -nahns]
noun
place or source of origin: The provenance of the ancient manuscript has never been determined.

Origin:
1860–65; < French, derivative of provenant, present participle of provenir < Latin prōvenīre to come forth; see pro-1, convene, -ant

provenance, province.
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World English Dictionary
provenance or chiefly (US) provenience (ˈprɒvɪnəns, prəʊˈviːnɪəns)
 
n
a place of origin, esp that of a work of art or archaeological specimen
 
[C19: from French, from provenir, from Latin prōvenīre to originate, from venīre to come]
 
provenience or chiefly (US) provenience
 
n
 
[C19: from French, from provenir, from Latin prōvenīre to originate, from venīre to come]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

provenance
1785, from Fr. provenance "origin, production," from provenant, prp. of M.Fr. provenir "come forth, arise," from L. provenire "come forth, organize," from pro- "forth" + venire "come."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
As the provenance of antiquities and artworks is questioned, so is the
  provenance of dealers themselves.
But the provenance of the cells is the source of their controversy.
The artifact's lack of provenance had always been a red flag to many scholars.
Trust and provenance as new factors for information retrieval in a tangled web.
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