prow

1 [prou]
noun
1.
the forepart of a ship or boat; bow.
2.
the front end of an airship.
3.
Literary. a ship.

Origin:
1545–55; < Middle French proue < Upper Italian (Genoese) prua < Latin prōra < Greek prôira

prowed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged

prow

2 [prou]
adjective Archaic.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Old French prou < Vulgar Latin *prōdis. See proud

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
prow (praʊ)
 
n
the bow of a vessel
 
[C16: from Old French proue, from Latin prora, from Greek prōra; related to Latin pro in front]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

prow
1555, from M.Fr. proue, from It. (Genoese) prua, from V.L. *proda, by dissimilation from L. prora "prow," from Gk. proira, related to pro "before, forward," proi "early in the morning."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Its rigid, narrow prow is designed for maximum thrills-per-minute.
Use a prow shape between the ocean and the building, and remember the debris and backflow.
Nearly ten feet of the yacht's stern was cut off by the sharp prow of the steamboat.
The bowsprit is a pole that stretches out over the sea from the prow of the ship.
Synonyms
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