punishing

[puhn-i-shing]

Origin:
1425–75; late Middle English punyesand; see punish, -ing2

nonpunishing, adjective
self-punishing, adjective
unpunishing, adjective
unpunishingly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged

punish

[puhn-ish]
verb (used with object)
1.
to subject to pain, loss, confinement, death, etc., as a penalty for some offense, transgression, or fault: to punish a criminal.
2.
to inflict a penalty for (an offense, fault, etc.): to punish theft.
3.
to handle severely or roughly, as in a fight.
4.
to put to painful exertion, as a horse in racing.
5.
Informal. to make a heavy inroad on; deplete: to punish a quart of whiskey.
verb (used without object)
6.
to inflict punishment.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English punischen < Middle French puniss-, long stem of punir < Latin pūnīre; akin to poena penalty, pain

punisher, noun
overpunish, verb
prepunish, verb (used with object)
quasi-punished, adjective
repunish, verb
self-punished, adjective
self-punisher, noun
unpunished, adjective
well-punished, adjective


1. chastise, castigate. Punish, correct, discipline refer to making evident public or private disapproval of violations of law, wrongdoing, or refusal to obey rules or regulations by imposing penalties. To punish is chiefly to inflict penalty or pain as a retribution for misdeeds, with little or no expectation of correction or improvement: to punish a thief. To correct is to reprove or inflict punishment for faults, specifically with the idea of bringing about improvement: to correct a rebellious child. To discipline is to give a kind of punishment that will educate or will establish useful habits: to discipline a careless driver. 1, 2. penalize.


1, 2. reward.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
punish (ˈpʌnɪʃ)
 
vb
1.  to force (someone) to undergo a penalty or sanction, such as imprisonment, fines, death, etc, for some crime or misdemeanour
2.  (tr) to inflict punishment for (some crime, etc)
3.  (tr) to use or treat harshly or roughly, esp as by overexertion: to punish a horse
4.  informal (tr) to consume (some commodity) in large quantities: to punish the bottle
 
[C14 punisse, from Old French punir, from Latin pūnīre to punish, from poena penalty]
 
'punisher
 
n
 
'punishing
 
adj
 
'punishingly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

punish
mid-14c., from O.Fr. puniss-, extended prp. stem of punir "to punish," from L. punire "inflict a penalty on, cause pain for some offense," earlier poenire, from poena "penalty, punishment" (see penal). Colloquial meaning "to inflict heavy damage or loss" is first recorded
1801, originally in boxing. Punishing "hard-hitting" is from 1811.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Evil overlords have a tough time when it comes to punishing geeks.
But their punishing high-speed hits come with an added risk of sustaining
  concussions.
Even if he couldn't have, punishing him may deter it in the future.
Punishing non-believers has been there from the beginning since it threatens
  believer's fantasies.
Related Words
Matching Quote
"I am the LORD your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery; you shall have no other gods before me.
You shall not make for yourself an idol, whether in the form of anything that is in heaven above, or that is on the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth. You shall not bow down to them or worship them; for I the LORD your God am a jealous God, punishing children for the iniquity of parents, to the third and the fourth generation of those who reject me, but showing steadfast love to the thousandth generation of those who love me and keep my commandments.
You shall not make wrongful use of the name of the LORD your God, for the LORD will not acquit anyone who misuses his name.
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Honor your father and your mother, so that your days may be long in the land that the LORD your God is giving you.
You shall not murder.
You shall not commit adultery.
You shall not steal.
You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor.
You shall not covet your neighbor's house; you shall not covet your neighbor's wife, or male or female slave, or ox, or donkey, or anything that belongs to your neighbor."
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