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reader

[ree-der] /ˈri dər/
noun
1.
a person who reads.
2.
a schoolbook for instruction and practice in reading:
a second-grade reader.
3.
a book of collected or assorted writings, especially when related in theme, authorship, or instructive purpose; anthology:
a Hemingway reader; a sci-fi reader.
4.
a person employed to read and evaluate manuscripts offered for publication.
5.
a proofreader.
6.
a person who reads or recites before an audience; elocutionist.
7.
a person authorized to read the lessons, Bible, etc., in a church service.
8.
a lecturer or instructor, especially in some British universities:
to be appointed reader in English history.
9.
an assistant to a professor, who grades examinations, papers, etc.
10.
Computers. a device that reads data, programs, or control information from an external storage medium for transmission to main storage.
11.
a machine or device that projects or enlarges a microform image on a screen or other surface for reading.
12.
a playing card marked on its back so that the suit or denomination of the card can be identified.
13.
Library Science. the user of a library; library patron.
Origin
1000
before 1000; Middle English reder(e), redar(e), Old English rǣdere. See read1, -er1
Related forms
nonreader, noun
subreader, noun
underreader, noun

optical scanning

noun
1.
the process of interpreting data in printed, handwritten, bar-code, or other visual form by a device (optical scanner or reader) that scans and identifies the data.
Origin
1955-60
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for readers
  • Swift, for example, does not directly tell his readers what is of value.
  • The majority of readers, and even of writers, demand only that they have a sense.
  • The series has received praise from authors, publishers, readers and critics alike.
  • In so doing we raise the question of our own fitness as readers.
  • The actual electoral impact cannot be known but readers were seriously misled.
  • The audience is invisible in the sense that a poet rarely meets his or her readers.
  • If it is on loan, readers will also know the date the item is due for return.
  • That eulogy provoked hundreds of letters from current readers and old radio fans alike.
  • Thus, the readers are left to decide for themselves if there was a peer review failure.
  • Each year gives the readers an exciting new storyline to read.
British Dictionary definitions for readers

reader

/ˈriːdə/
noun
1.
a person who reads
2.
a person who is fond of reading
3.
  1. (mainly Brit) at a university, a member of staff having a position between that of a senior lecturer and a professor
  2. (US) a teaching assistant in a faculty who grades papers, examinations, etc, on behalf of a professor
4.
  1. a book that is part of a planned series for those learning to read
  2. a standard textbook, esp for foreign-language learning
5.
a person who reads aloud in public
6.
a person who reads and assesses the merit of manuscripts submitted to a publisher
7.
a person employed to read proofs and indicate errors by comparison with the original copy; proofreader
8.
short for lay reader
9.
(Judaism, mainly Brit) another word for cantor (sense 1)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for readers

reader

n.

Old English rædere "person who reads aloud to others; lector; scholar; diviner, interpreter," agent noun from rædan (see read (v.)). Cf. Dutch rader "adviser," Old High German ratari "counselor." Old English fem. form was rædistre.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for readers

readers

noun

Marked playing cards: The cards and dice were crooked, the cards being readers (1894+ Gambling)


reader

Related Terms

mitt-reader


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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8
8
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