rebound

[v. ri-bound, ree-bound; n. ree-bound, ri-bound]
verb (used without object)
1.
to bound or spring back from force of impact.
2.
to recover, as from ill health or discouragement.
3.
Basketball. to gain hold of rebounds: a forward who rebounds well off the offensive board.
verb (used with object)
4.
to cause to bound back; cast back.
5.
Basketball. to gain hold of (a rebound): The guard rebounded the ball in backcourt.
noun
6.
the act of rebounding; recoil.
7.
Basketball.
a.
a ball that bounces off the backboard or the rim of the basket.
b.
an instance of gaining hold of such a ball.
8.
Ice Hockey. a puck that bounces off the gear or person of a goalkeeper attempting to make a save.
Idioms
9.
on the rebound,
a.
after bouncing off the ground, a wall, etc.: He hit the ball on the rebound.
b.
after being rejected by another: She didn't really love him; she married him on the rebound.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English (v.) < Middle French rebondir, equivalent to Old French re- re- + bondir to bound2

rebound, redound, resound.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
rebound
 
vb
1.  to spring back, as from a sudden impact
2.  to misfire, esp so as to hurt the perpetrator: the plan rebounded
 
n
3.  the act or an instance of rebounding
4.  on the rebound
 a.  in the act of springing back
 b.  informal in a state of recovering from rejection, disappointment, etc: he married her on the rebound from an unhappy love affair
 
[C14: from Old French rebondir, from re- + bondir to bound²]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

rebound
c.1300, "to spring, leap," also "return to afflict" (early 15c.), from O.Fr. rebondir "leap back, resound," from re- "back" + bondir "leap, bound" (see bound (v.)). Sense of "to spring back from force of impact" is recorded from late 14c. Sports use probably first in tennis;
basketball sense is attested from 1954. The noun is first recorded 1520s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Idioms & Phrases

rebound

see on the rebound.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.
Copyright © 1997. Published by Houghton Mifflin.
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Example sentences
Yet almost any kind of pain pill can cause rebound problems if used to excess.
The fortunes of the others mark a sharp rebound since the turn of the year.
Its rebound was such that foresters grew it for pulp production.
Researchers show for the first time that stunted fisheries can rebound with
  time.
Idioms & Phrases
Images for rebound
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