follow Dictionary.com

Is irregardless a word?

recollected

[rek-uh-lek-tid] /ˌrɛk əˈlɛk tɪd/
adjective
1.
calm; composed.
2.
remembered; recalled.
3.
characterized by or given to contemplation.
Origin of recollected
1620-1630
1620-30; recollect, re-collect + -ed2
Related forms
recollectedly, adverb
recollectedness, noun
unrecollected, adjective

re-collect

[ree-kuh-lekt] /ˌri kəˈlɛkt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to collect, gather, or assemble again (something scattered).
2.
to rally (one's faculties, powers, spirits, etc.); recover or compose (oneself).
Origin
1605-15
Can be confused
re-collect, recollect.

recollect

[rek-uh-lekt] /ˌrɛk əˈlɛkt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to recall to mind; recover knowledge of by memory; remember.
2.
to absorb (oneself) in spiritual meditation, especially during prayer.
verb (used without object)
3.
to have a recollection; remember.
Origin
1550-60; < Medieval Latin recollēctus, past participle of recolligere to remember, recollect (Latin: to gather up again); see re-, collect1
Related forms
recollective, adjective
recollectively, adverb
recollectiveness, noun
misrecollect, verb
nonrecollective, adjective
self-recollective, adjective
unrecollective, adjective
Can be confused
re-collect, recollect.
Synonyms
1. See remember.
Antonyms
1. forget.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for recollected
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • The countenance, the manners and the recollected words of Barnardine, when he had spoken of her aunt, confirmed her worst fears.

    The Mysteries of Udolpho Ann Radcliffe
  • Angelique recollected the night she had passed there under the protection of these saints.

    The Dream Emile Zola
  • That little boat felt like a toy at the will of the winds and waves, till one recollected who held the storm in His hand.'

    The Heir of Redclyffe Charlotte M. Yonge
  • I belonged to this boat, and I now recollected that she had been towing astern.

    Ned Myers James Fenimore Cooper
  • The doctor now recollected what had passed with Booth, and perceived he had made a mistake of one colonel for another.

    Amelia Henry Fielding
  • Christian had been a shy and commonplace-enough boy as she recollected him.

    The Slave Of The Lamp Henry Seton Merriman
  • My hand slid into my pocket involuntarily; then I recollected that I was not in Britain, and withdrew it again carelessly.

    In Search of El Dorado Alexander MacDonald
  • In fact, I recollected too well to be able to pay the expected compliment.

  • Nacional recollected with indignation the schemes and outrages of the opposition to bring about this neglect of civic duty.

    The Blood of the Arena Vicente Blasco Ibez
British Dictionary definitions for recollected

recollect

/ˌrɛkəˈlɛkt/
verb
1.
(when transitive, often takes a clause as object) to recall from memory; remember
Derived Forms
recollective, adjective
recollectively, adverb
Word Origin
C16: from Latin recolligere to gather again, from re- + colligere to collect1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for recollected

re-collect

v.

"to collect or gather again," c.1600, from re- + collect (v.). Earlier simply "to collect" (1510s). Related: Re-collected; re-collecting.

recollect

v.

"remember, recover knowledge of," 1550s, from Latin recollectus, past participle of recolligere, literally "to collect again," from re- "again" (see re-) + colligere "gather" (see collect). Related: Recollected; recollecting. The pronunciation is based on recollection.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for recollected

Few English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for recollected

0
20
Scrabble Words With Friends