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recovery

[ri-kuhv-uh-ree] /rɪˈkʌv ə ri/
noun, plural recoveries.
1.
an act of recovering.
2.
the regaining of or possibility of regaining something lost or taken away.
3.
restoration or return to health from sickness.
4.
restoration or return to any former and better state or condition.
5.
time required for recovering.
6.
something that is gained in recovering.
7.
an improvement in the economy marking the end of a recession or decline.
8.
the regaining of substances in usable form, as from refuse material or waste products.
9.
Law. the obtaining of right to something by verdict or judgment of a court of law.
10.
Football. an act or instance of recovering a fumble.
11.
Fencing. the movement to the position of guard after a lunge.
12.
Rowing. a return to a former position for making the next stroke.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English < Anglo-French recoverie. See recover, -y3
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for recovery
  • In this example you can see the normal process of recovery from trauma reflected in the client s dreams.
  • We can actually care about the health and recovery of our colleagues and wish them the best.
  • We out unsuspecting souls so that they can begin the slow process of recovery.
  • At the industrial level, the biggest contributors to the recovery have been autos and health care.
  • Manufacturing is one of the bright spots of a generally disappointing recovery.
  • The recovery was somewhat more than he'd bargained for.
  • Taken together the data are suggestive of a recovery in housing driven by renters.
  • In fact, scientists are stunned at the area's recovery.
  • May show partial defoliation after a cold snap, but recovery is rapid.
  • Given that, his recovery time wasn't stellar, depending on what was done.
British Dictionary definitions for recovery

recovery

/rɪˈkʌvərɪ/
noun (pl) -eries
1.
the act or process of recovering, esp from sickness, a shock, or a setback; recuperation
2.
restoration to a former or better condition
3.
the regaining of something lost
4.
the extraction of useful substances from waste
5.
the recovery of a space capsule after a space flight
6.
(law)
  1. the obtaining of a right, etc, by the judgment of a court
  2. (in the US) the final judgment or verdict in a case
7.
(fencing) a return to the position of guard after making an attack
8.
(swimming, rowing) the action of bringing the arm, oar, etc, forward for another stroke
9.
(golf) a stroke played from the rough or a bunker to the fairway or green
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for recovery
n.

mid-14c., "return to health," from Anglo-French recoverie (c.1300), Old French recovree "remedy, cure, recovery," from past participle stem of recovrer (see recover). Meaning "a gaining possession by legal action" is from early 15c. That of "act of righting oneself after a blunder, mishap, etc." is from 1520s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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