follow Dictionary.com

Today's Word of the Day means...

relaxed

[ri-lakst] /rɪˈlækst/
adjective
1.
being free of or relieved from tension or anxiety:
in a relaxed mood.
2.
not strict; easy; informal:
the relaxed rules of the club.
Origin
1630-1640
1630-40; relax + -ed2
Related forms
relaxedly
[ri-lak-sid-lee, -lakst-lee] /rɪˈlæk sɪd li, -ˈlækst li/ (Show IPA),
adverb
relaxedness, noun
unrelaxed, adjective

relax

[ri-laks] /rɪˈlæks/
verb (used with object)
1.
to make less tense, rigid, or firm; make lax:
to relax the muscles.
2.
to diminish the force of.
3.
to slacken or abate, as effort, attention, etc.
4.
to make less strict or severe, as rules, discipline, etc.:
to relax the requirements for a license.
5.
to release or bring relief from the effects of tension, anxiety, etc.:
A short swim always relaxes me.
verb (used without object)
6.
to become less tense, rigid, or firm.
7.
to become less strict or severe; grow milder.
8.
to reduce or stop work, effort, application, etc., especially for the sake of rest or recreation.
9.
to release oneself from inhibition, worry, tension, etc.
Origin
1350-1400; Middle English relaxen < Latin relaxāre to stretch out again, loosen, equivalent to re- re- + laxāre to loosen, derivative of laxus slack, lax
Related forms
relaxative, relaxatory
[ri-lak-suh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] /rɪˈlæk səˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i/ (Show IPA),
adjective
relaxer, noun
overrelax, verb
unrelaxing, adjective
Synonyms
1, 6. loosen, slacken. 2. mitigate, weaken, lessen, reduce. 4. ease. 6. unbend. 7. relent, soften.
Antonyms
1, 6. tighten, tense.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples for relaxed
  • Changing that context begins with making sure a dog is relaxed before going to the groomers.
  • It sure will make me de-stress and feel more relaxed.
  • relaxed and open and at the same time taut with the intention to appear relaxed and open, it's an actor's smile, a mask.
  • After more than seven years of trial and error, it is time to examine the outcomes of those relaxed initial eligibility standards.
  • No surprise, drunk animals were more relaxed and had less anxiety, and had trouble learning to avoid possible danger.
  • See how this remodel turned a dark home into an airy platform for relaxed living more.
  • But the official restrictions have been repeatedly relaxed over the past decade at war.
  • The best outfit for you will make you feel comfortable, appropriate, and relaxed.
  • These would have to be relaxed when the directive comes into effect.
  • They can be sophisticated or playful, tailored or relaxed.
British Dictionary definitions for relaxed

relax

/rɪˈlæks/
verb
1.
to make (muscles, a grip, etc) less tense or rigid or (of muscles, a grip, etc) to become looser or less rigid
2.
(intransitive) to take rest or recreation, as from work or effort on Sundays, she just relaxes, she relaxes by playing golf
3.
to lessen the force of (effort, concentration, etc) or (of effort) to become diminished
4.
to make (rules or discipline) less rigid or strict or (of rules, etc) to diminish in severity
5.
(intransitive) (of a person) to become less formal; unbend
Derived Forms
relaxable, adjective
relaxed, adjective
relaxedly (rɪˈlæksɪdlɪ) adverb
Word Origin
C15: from Latin relaxāre to loosen, from re- + laxāre to loosen, from laxus loose, lax
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for relaxed
relax
c.1420, "to make (something) less compact or dense," from O.Fr. relaxer (14c.), from L. relaxare "relax, loosen, open," from re- "back" + laxare "loosen," from laxus "loose" (see lax). Of persons, attested from 1837, "to become less formal;" meaning "to become less tense" is recorded from 1935. Relaxation "relief from work" first recorded 1548.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
relaxed in Medicine

relax re·lax (rĭ-lāks')
v. re·laxed, re·lax·ing, re·lax·es

  1. To make or become lax or loose.

  2. To relieve or become relieved from tension or strain.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source

Word of The Day

Difficulty index for relaxed

Most English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for relaxed

15
16
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with relaxed