renegade

[ren-i-geyd]
noun
1.
a person who deserts a party or cause for another.
2.
an apostate from a religious faith.
adjective
3.
of or like a renegade; traitorous.

Origin:
1575–85; < Spanish renegado < Medieval Latin renegātus (noun use of past participle of renegāre to desert, renege), equivalent to re- re- + neg-, base of negāre to deny + -ātus -ade1


1. traitor, deserter, betrayer, dissenter.
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World English Dictionary
renegade (ˈrɛnɪˌɡeɪd)
 
n
1.  a.  a person who deserts his or her cause or faith for another; apostate; traitor
 b.  (as modifier): a renegade priest
2.  any outlaw or rebel
 
[C16: from Spanish renegado, from Medieval Latin renegāre to renounce, from Latin re- + negāre to deny]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

renegade
1580s, "apostate," probably (with change of suffix) from Sp. renegado, originally "Christian turned Muslim," from M.L. renegatus, prop. pp. of renegare "deny" (see renege). General sense of "turncoat" is from 1660s. The form renegate, directly from M.L., is attested in Eng. from late 14c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Any nation that potters with any glory of its past, as a thing dead and done for, is to that extent renegade.
Original paint with the renegade marking on the hood.
The renegade intelligence buff said he was relieved.
Cancer is a disease that begins as a renegade human cell over which the body
  has lost control.
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