repudiation

[ri-pyoo-dee-ey-shuhn]
noun
1.
the act of repudiating.
2.
the state of being repudiated.
3.
refusal, as by a state or municipality, to pay a lawful debt.

Origin:
1535–45; < Latin repudiātiōn- (stem of repudiātiō), equivalent to repudiāt(us) (see repudiate) + -iōn- -ion

repudiatory [ri-pyoo-dee-uh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] , adjective
nonrepudiation, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To repudiation
Collins
World English Dictionary
repudiate (rɪˈpjuːdɪˌeɪt)
 
vb
1.  to reject the authority or validity of; refuse to accept or ratify: Congress repudiated the treaty that the President had negotiated
2.  to refuse to acknowledge or pay (a debt)
3.  to cast off or disown (a son, lover, etc)
 
[C16: from Latin repudiāre to put away, from repudium a separation, divorce, from re- + pudēre to be ashamed]
 
re'pudiable
 
adj
 
repudi'ation
 
n
 
re'pudiative
 
adj
 
re'pudiator
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Example sentences
He construes his election as a repudiation of the law by the people.
In offering a repudiation of the previous administration, he also promised a
  new era of transparency.
Whenever an economy allows debt to grow faster than wealth can be created, that
  economy has a need for debt repudiation.
The repudiation of the multi-party talks is also threatening to spread.
Related Words
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;