re-side

[v. ree-sahyd; n. ree-sahyd]
verb (used with object), re-sided, re-siding.
1.
to replace the siding on (a building).
verb (used without object), re-sided, re-siding.
2.
to apply new siding, as to a house.
noun
3.
a piece or section of siding: to put backing material on the re-sides.
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reside

[ri-zahyd]
verb (used without object), resided, residing.
1.
to dwell permanently or for a considerable time: She resides at 15 Maple Street.
2.
(of things, qualities, etc.) to abide, lie, or be present habitually; exist or be inherent (usually followed by in ).
3.
to rest or be vested, as powers, rights, etc. (usually followed by in ).

Origin:
1425–75; late Middle English residen < Middle French resider < Latin residēre, equivalent to re- re- + -sidēre, combining form of sedēre to sit1

resider, noun


1. live, abide, sojourn, stay, lodge, remain.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
reside (rɪˈzaɪd)
 
vb
1.  to live permanently or for a considerable time (in a place); have one's home (in): he now resides in London
2.  (of things, qualities, etc) to be inherently present (in); be vested (in): political power resides in military strength
 
[C15: from Latin residēre to sit back, from re- + sedēre to sit]
 
re'sider
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

reside
c.1460, "to settle," from O.Fr. resider, from L. residere "to remain behind, rest," from re- "back, again" + sedere "to sit" (see sedentary). Meaning "to dwell permanently" first attested 1578. Resident first recorded 1382, as an adj.; the noun meaning "one who resides"
is from 1487. Meaning "medical graduate in practice in a hospital as training" first attested 1892, Amer.Eng.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
But come the general election, the winner will tack back towards the centre,
  where the crucial independent voter resides.
And yet it is not simply in his record of aggression, cruelty and recklessness
  that the peril to the wider world resides.
The storage and processing that currently resides in our desktops and laptops
  is moving to large data centers.
For one thing, the best engineering talent resides at big-name companies.
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