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resist

[ri-zist] /rɪˈzɪst/
verb (used with object)
1.
to withstand, strive against, or oppose:
to resist infection; to resist temptation.
2.
to withstand the action or effect of:
to resist spoilage.
3.
to refrain or abstain from, especially with difficulty or reluctance:
They couldn't resist the chocolates.
verb (used without object)
4.
to make a stand or make efforts in opposition; act in opposition; offer resistance.
noun
5.
a substance that prevents or inhibits some effect from taking place, as a coating on a surface of a metallic printing plate that prevents or inhibits corrosion of the metal by acid.
6.
Textiles. a chemically inert substance used in resist printing.
Origin
1325-1375
1325-75; Middle English resisten (v.) < Latin resistere to remain standing, equivalent to re- re- + sistere to cause to stand, akin to stāre to stand
Related forms
resister, noun
resistingly, adverb
interresist, verb
nonresisting, adjective
overresist, verb
quasi-resisted, adjective
unresisted, adjective
unresisting, adjective
Can be confused
resister, resistor.
Synonyms
1. confront, counteract, rebuff. See oppose.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for resist
  • The station was designed to withstand a powerful earthquake and also to resist a tsunami.
  • Control pests and diseases with nonchemical methods or low-toxicity chemicals and by choosing varieties that resist disease.
  • The world is rarely kind to those who resist its mad course.
  • Commerce abhors a vacuum, and it appears that this beguiling island cannot indefinitely resist development.
  • Many of them could resist the suction of even our industrial-strength vacuum cleaner.
  • Yes, there are those that resist change and others that accept it.
  • With virtual reality you have a world with many of the qualities of the physical world, but it doesn't resist us.
  • The authors couldn't resist a little pride in their article abstract, writing.
  • He therefore who may resist must be allowed to strike.
  • At length she could no longer resist the desire to hear some news of her lover.
British Dictionary definitions for resist

resist

/rɪˈzɪst/
verb
1.
to stand firm (against); not yield (to); fight (against)
2.
(transitive) to withstand the deleterious action of; be proof against: to resist corrosion
3.
(transitive) to oppose; refuse to accept or comply with: to resist arrest, to resist the introduction of new technology
4.
(transitive) to refrain from, esp in spite of temptation (esp in the phrases cannot or could not resist (something))
noun
5.
a substance used to protect something, esp a coating that prevents corrosion
Derived Forms
resister, noun
resistible, adjective
resistibility, noun
resistibly, adverb
Word Origin
C14: from Latin resistere to stand still, oppose, from re- + sistere to stand firm
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for resist
v.

late 14c., from Old French resister "hold out against" (14c.), from Latin resistere "to make a stand against, oppose; to stand back; withstand," from re- "against" (see re-) + sistere "take a stand, stand firm" (see assist). Related: Resisted; resisting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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