follow Dictionary.com

Know how to use "fewer" and "less"? Find out.

resist

[ri-zist] /rɪˈzɪst/
verb (used with object)
1.
to withstand, strive against, or oppose:
to resist infection; to resist temptation.
2.
to withstand the action or effect of:
to resist spoilage.
3.
to refrain or abstain from, especially with difficulty or reluctance:
They couldn't resist the chocolates.
verb (used without object)
4.
to make a stand or make efforts in opposition; act in opposition; offer resistance.
noun
5.
a substance that prevents or inhibits some effect from taking place, as a coating on a surface of a metallic printing plate that prevents or inhibits corrosion of the metal by acid.
6.
Textiles. a chemically inert substance used in resist printing.
Origin
1325-1375
1325-75; Middle English resisten (v.) < Latin resistere to remain standing, equivalent to re- re- + sistere to cause to stand, akin to stāre to stand
Related forms
resister, noun
resistingly, adverb
interresist, verb
nonresisting, adjective
overresist, verb
quasi-resisted, adjective
unresisted, adjective
unresisting, adjective
Can be confused
resister, resistor.
Synonyms
1. confront, counteract, rebuff. See oppose.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for resisting
  • These words invite you to decipher their meanings, all the while resisting interpretation.
  • Rubberized inner deck coating grips the kayak combing from the inside, resisting slippage.
  • But the skin is rubbery and durable, resisting tears and punctures.
  • The challenge of working at a travel magazine is resisting the constant temptation to travel.
  • It has a steel shank with an oil and slip resisting rubber sole and leather heel slide.
  • But the great critical essayists, resisting that temptation, subordinate all details to the general design.
  • The farmers have been beaten, and several of them killed while resisting eviction from their homes.
  • He will not be baffled, or catch at clouds, but the mind must have a symbol palpable and resisting.
  • AN invincible courage and constancy in resisting evil is a necessary ingredient of virtue, especially in the episcopal character.
  • Pride of race and hostile creed vehemently resisting, proved too much for us.
British Dictionary definitions for resisting

resist

/rɪˈzɪst/
verb
1.
to stand firm (against); not yield (to); fight (against)
2.
(transitive) to withstand the deleterious action of; be proof against: to resist corrosion
3.
(transitive) to oppose; refuse to accept or comply with: to resist arrest, to resist the introduction of new technology
4.
(transitive) to refrain from, esp in spite of temptation (esp in the phrases cannot or could not resist (something))
noun
5.
a substance used to protect something, esp a coating that prevents corrosion
Derived Forms
resister, noun
resistible, adjective
resistibility, noun
resistibly, adverb
Word Origin
C14: from Latin resistere to stand still, oppose, from re- + sistere to stand firm
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for resisting

resist

v.

late 14c., from Old French resister "hold out against" (14c.), from Latin resistere "to make a stand against, oppose; to stand back; withstand," from re- "against" (see re-) + sistere "take a stand, stand firm" (see assist). Related: Resisted; resisting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for resist

Most English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for resisting

10
12
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with resisting