restive

[res-tiv]
adjective
1.
impatient of control, restraint, or delay, as persons; restless; uneasy.
2.
refractory; stubborn.
3.
refusing to go forward; balky: a restive horse.

Origin:
1375–1425; rest2 + -ive; replacing late Middle English restif stationary, balking < Old French: inert

restively, adverb
restiveness, noun

restful, restive.


1. nervous, unquiet. 2. recalcitrant, disobedient, obstinate.


1. patient, quiet. 2. obedient, tractable.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
restive (ˈrɛstɪv)
 
adj
1.  restless, nervous, or uneasy
2.  impatient of control or authority
 
[C16: from Old French restif balky, from rester to remain]
 
'restively
 
adv
 
'restiveness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

restive
c.1410, restyffe "not moving forward," from M.Fr. restif (fem. restive) "motionless," from rester "to remain" (see rest (2)). Sense of "unmanageable" (1687) evolved via notion of a horse refusing to go forward.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The logic doesn't fly, and it has given rise to an increasingly restive adjunct population.
Sometimes they are built to keep restive populations from fleeing.
Notoriously restive motorcycle taxi drivers were paid off to deter gang violence.
Much of the citizenry has become more restive-less accepting of the way things are.
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