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Denotation vs. Connotation

restrained

[ri-streynd] /rɪˈstreɪnd/
adjective
1.
characterized by restraint:
The actor gave a restrained performance.
Origin of restrained
1570-1580
1570-80; restrain + -ed2
Related forms
restrainedly, adverb
nonrestrained, adjective

re-strain

[ree-streyn] /riˈstreɪn/
verb (used with object), verb (used without object)
1.
to strain again.
Origin
1870-75; re- + strain1
Can be confused
re-strain, restrain.

restrain

[ri-streyn] /rɪˈstreɪn/
verb (used with object)
1.
to hold back from action; keep in check or under control; repress:
to restrain one's temper.
2.
to deprive of liberty, as by arrest or the like.
3.
to limit or hamper the activity, growth, or effect of:
to restrain trade with Cuba.
Origin
1350-1400; Middle English restreynen < Middle French restreindre < Latin restringere to bind back, bind fast, equivalent to re- re- + stringere to draw together; see strain1
Related forms
restrainable, adjective
restrainability, noun
restrainingly, adverb
overrestrain, verb (used with object)
prerestrain, verb (used with object)
unrestrainable, adjective
Can be confused
refrain, restrain.
re-strain, restrain.
Synonyms
1. bridle, suppress, constrain. See check1 . 2. restrict, circumscribe, confine, hinder, hamper.
Antonyms
1. unbridle. 2. free, liberate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for restrained
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • He looked, Rainey thought, like a blind Berserker, restrained only by his affliction.

    A Man to His Mate J. Allan Dunn
  • But his curiosity was too strong to be restrained by mere compassion.

    The Secret Agent Joseph Conrad
  • She dressed modestly in a taste that was quiet and restrained.

    War-time Silhouettes Stephen Hudson
  • He felt her eye was upon him, and restrained his emotions as he proceeded.

    Night and Morning, Complete Edward Bulwer-Lytton
  • restrained from open vice by educational views and the fear of man, how much ungodliness has reigned within me!

British Dictionary definitions for restrained

restrained

/rɪˈstreɪnd/
adjective
1.
(of a person or person's manner) calm and unemotional
2.
(of clothes, décor, etc) subtle and tasteful
Derived Forms
restrainedly (rɪˈstreɪnɪdlɪ) adverb

restrain

/rɪˈstreɪn/
verb (transitive)
1.
to hold (someone) back from some action, esp by force
2.
to deprive (someone) of liberty, as by imprisonment
3.
to limit or restrict
Derived Forms
restrainable, adjective
Word Origin
C14 restreyne, from Old French restreindre, from Latin rēstringere to draw back tightly, from re- + stringere to draw, bind; see strain1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for restrained
adj.

"repressed, kept under control," 1570s, past participle adjective from restrain.

restrain

v.

mid-14c., from stem of Old French restreindre "press, push together; curb, bridle; bandage" (12c.), from Latin restringere "draw back tightly, confine, check" (see restriction). Related: Restrained; restraining.

That which we restrain we keep within limits; that which we restrict we keep within certain definite limits; that which we repress we try to put out of existence. [Century Dictionary, 1902]

re-strain

v.

"strain again," 1874, from re- + strain (v.). Related: Re-strained; re-straining.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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