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roar

[rawr, rohr] /rɔr, roʊr/
verb (used without object)
1.
to utter a loud, deep cry or howl, as in excitement, distress, or anger.
2.
to laugh loudly or boisterously:
to roar at a joke.
3.
to make a loud sound or din, as thunder, cannon, waves, or wind.
4.
to function or move with a loud, deep sound, as a vehicle:
The automobile roared away.
5.
to make a loud noise in breathing, as a horse.
verb (used with object)
6.
to utter or express in a roar:
to roar denials.
7.
to bring, put, make, etc., by roaring:
to roar oneself hoarse.
noun
8.
a loud, deep cry or howl, as of an animal or a person:
the roar of a lion.
9.
a loud, confused, constant noise or sound; din; clamor:
the roar of the surf; the roar of lively conversation from the crowded party.
10.
a loud outburst:
a roar of laughter; a roar of approval from the audience.
Origin of roar
900
before 900; Middle English roren (v.), Old English rārian; cognate with Old High German rēren to bellow
Related forms
roarer, noun
outroar, verb (used with object)
underroarer, noun
Synonyms
1. bawl, yell. See cry. 3. resound, boom, thunder, peal.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for roar
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • The silence was broken by the zip-zip of rifles, the roar of guns, and the whine of shells as they flew towards our lines.

  • Not from the street, for all beside was still; even the roar of London was hushed!

    Weighed and Wanting George MacDonald
  • They swept around the circle at a sharp gallop, the clanking spurs and rattling sabres keeping time to the roar of the music.

    Betty at Fort Blizzard Molly Elliot Seawell
  • Rain fell in torrents; the crashing thunder was like the roar of artillery.

    The Roof of France Matilda Betham-Edwards
  • "Oh, you're the limit," chuckled Ralph, going off into a roar of laughter at the ranch boy's expense.

British Dictionary definitions for roar

roar

/rɔː/
verb (mainly intransitive)
1.
(of lions and other animals) to utter characteristic loud growling cries
2.
(also transitive) (of people) to utter (something) with a loud deep cry, as in anger or triumph
3.
to laugh in a loud hearty unrestrained manner
4.
(of horses) to breathe with laboured rasping sounds See roaring (sense 6)
5.
(of the wind, waves, etc) to blow or break loudly and violently, as during a storm
6.
(of a fire) to burn fiercely with a roaring sound
7.
(of a machine, gun, etc) to operate or move with a loud harsh noise
8.
(transitive) to bring (oneself) into a certain condition by roaring: to roar oneself hoarse
noun
9.
a loud deep cry, uttered by a person or crowd, esp in anger or triumph
10.
a prolonged loud cry of certain animals, esp lions
11.
any similar noise made by a fire, the wind, waves, artillery, an engine, etc
12.
a loud unrestrained burst of laughter
See also roar up
Derived Forms
roarer, noun
Word Origin
Old English rārian; related to Old High German rērēn, Middle Dutch reren
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for roar
v.

Old English rarian "roar, wail, lament, bellow, cry," probably of imitative origin (cf. Middle Dutch reeren, German röhren "to roar;" Sanskrit ragati "barks;" Lithuanian reju "to scold;" Old Church Slavonic revo "I roar;" Latin raucus "hoarse"). Related: Roared; roaring.

n.

late 14c., from roar (v.) and Old English gerar.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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