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robin

[rob-in] /ˈrɒb ɪn/
noun
1.
any of several small Old World birds having a red or reddish breast, especially Erithacus rubecula, of Europe.
2.
a large American thrush, Turdus migratorius, having a chestnut-red breast and abdomen.
3.
any of several similar thrushes of the New World tropics, not necessarily having reddish underparts, as T. grayi (clay-colored robin) of Mexico and Central America.
Also called robin redbreast (for defs 1, 2).
Origin
1540-1550
1540-50; short for robin redbreast

Robin

[rob-in] /ˈrɒb ɪn/
noun
1.
a male or female given name: derived from Robert.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for robin
  • It is the pale blue half of a robin's egg left from the spring.
  • When the buzzer sounds, half of the singles move to another chair and a different partner, in a kind of round robin.
  • In fact, the virus may be why the once-growing robin population has leveled off.
  • If anything, since then the use of chemicals has become much more widespread and the robin still thrives.
  • robin nest failures are common and especially when they select a nest site near humans.
  • robin enters, claiming to seek advice from rose about a friend who is in love.
  • The term mad robin comes from the name of a dance which has the move.
British Dictionary definitions for robin

robin

/ˈrɒbɪn/
noun
1.
Also called robin redbreast. a small Old World songbird, Erithacus rubecula, related to the thrushes: family Muscicapidae. The male has a brown back, orange-red breast and face, and grey underparts
2.
a North American thrush, Turdus migratorius, similar to but larger than the Old World robin
3.
any of various similar birds having a reddish breast
Word Origin
C16: arbitrary use of given name
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for robin
n.

common European songbird, 1540s, shortening of Robin Redbreast (mid-15c.), from masc. personal name Robin. It ousted the native ruddock. In North America, the name was applied to the red-breasted thrush by 1703. Robin's egg as a shade of blue is attested from 1881.

Robin

masc. proper name, from Old French Robin, diminutive of Robert (q.v.). Robin Goodfellow "sportive elf of the English countryside," is first attested 1530s, popular 16-17c.; Robin Hood is at least from late 14c.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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