rookie

[rook-ee]
noun
1.
an athlete playing his or her first season as a member of a professional sports team: The rookie replaced the injured regular at first base.
2.
a raw recruit, as in the army or on a police force.
3.
a novice; tyro.

Origin:
1890–95; alteration of recruit; see -y2

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
rookie (ˈrʊkɪ)
 
n
informal an inexperienced person or newcomer, esp a raw recruit in the army
 
[C20: changed from recruit]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

rookie
1892, "raw recruit," originally in Kipling's Barrack-Room Ballads, perhaps from recruit, influenced by rook (1) in its secondary sense, suggesting "easy to cheat."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang Dictionary

rookie definition

[ˈrʊki]
and rooky
  1. n.
    a person new at something; a neophyte, especially a police officer or a ballplayer. : The rookie tackled the old-time player and earned a lot of cheering and applause.
Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions by Richard A. Spears.Fourth Edition.
Copyright 2007. Published by McGraw-Hill Education.
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Example sentences
One was a rookie still fired up over one of his first arrests.
The question isn't who gets on the field as a rookie or even how much, but who's still there several seasons later.
Rookie controllers, antiquated equipment, and federal mismanagement combine to produce inefficiency and danger.
Their owners are less experienced in business, so may make rookie mistakes.
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