sad

[sad]
adjective, sadder, saddest.
1.
affected by unhappiness or grief; sorrowful or mournful: to feel sad because a close friend has moved away.
2.
expressive of or characterized by sorrow: sad looks; a sad song.
3.
causing sorrow: a sad disappointment; sad news.
4.
(of color) somber, dark, or dull; drab.
5.
deplorably bad; sorry: a sad attempt.
6.
Obsolete. firm or steadfast.

Origin:
before 1000; Middle English; Old English sæd grave, heavy, weary, orig. sated, full; cognate with German satt, Gothic saths full, satisfied; akin to Latin satis enough, satur sated, Greek hádēn enough. See satiate, saturate

sadly, adverb
sadness, noun


1. unhappy, despondent, disconsolate, discouraged, gloomy, downcast, downhearted, depressed, dejected, melancholy.


1. happy.
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World English Dictionary
sad (sæd)
 
adj , sadder, saddest
1.  feeling sorrow; unhappy
2.  causing, suggestive, or expressive of such feelings: a sad story
3.  unfortunate; unsatisfactory; shabby; deplorable: her clothes were in a sad state
4.  informal (Brit) ludicrously contemptible; pathetic: he's a sad, boring little wimp
5.  (of pastry, cakes, etc) not having risen fully; heavy
6.  (of a colour) lacking brightness; dull or dark
7.  archaic serious; grave
 
vb
8.  (NZ) to express sadness or displeasure strongly
 
[Old English sæd weary; related to Old Norse sathr, Gothic saths, Latin satur, satis enough]
 
'sadly
 
adv
 
'sadness
 
n

SAD
 
abbreviation for
seasonal affective disorder

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

sad
O.E. sæd "sated," from P.Gmc. *sathaz (cf. O.N. saðr, M.Du. sat, Du. zad, O.H.G. sat, Ger. satt, Goth. saþs "satiated"), from PIE *seto- (cf. L. satis "enough, sufficient," O.C.S. sytu, Lith. sotus, O.Ir. saith "satiety"), from base *sa- "satisfied" (cf. Skt. a-sinvan "insatiable"). Sense
development seems to have passed through a meaning "heavy," and "weary, tired of" before emerging c.1300 as "unhappy." An alternative course would be through "steadfast, firm," and "serious" to "grave." In the main modern sense, it replaced O.E. unrot, negative of rot "cheerful, glad." Slang sense of "inferior, pathetic" is from 1899; sad sack is 1920s, popularized by World War II armed forces (specifically by cartoon character invented by Sgt. George Baker, 1942, and published in U.S. Armed Forces magazine "Yank"), probably a euphemistic shortening of common military slang phrase sad sack of shit. The verb sadden "to make sorrowful" is from 1600; earlier form was sade, from O.E. sadian.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

SAD abbr.
seasonal affective disorder

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Abbreviations & Acronyms
SAD
seasonal affective disorder
The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
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